Gladiator definition

glădē-ātər
Frequency:
Any person taking part in a public controversy or fight.
noun
5
1
In ancient Rome, a man trained to fight animals or other men with weapons in an arena, for the entertainment of spectators.
noun
3
0
(sports) A professional boxer.
noun
3
2
A person, usually a professional combatant, a captive, or a slave, trained to entertain the public by engaging in mortal combat with another person or a wild animal in the ancient Roman arena.
noun
1
1
(in ancient Rome) A person (professional or slave) who entertained the public by engaging in mortal combat with another, or with a wild animal.
noun
0
0
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(by extension) A disputant in a public controversy or debate.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
A person, usually a professional combatant, a captive, or a slave, trained to entertain the public by engaging in mortal combat with another person or a wild animal in the ancient Roman arena.
noun
0
2
A person engaged in a controversy or debate, especially in public; a disputant.
noun
0
2
(sports) A professional boxer.
noun
0
2
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A person engaged in a controversy or debate, especially in public; a disputant.
noun
0
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
gladiator
Plural:
gladiators

Origin of gladiator

  • Middle English from Latin gladiātor from gladius sword of Celtic origin Old Irish claideb

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Latin gladiātor from gladius sword of Celtic origin Old Irish claideb

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin gladiātor, from gladius (“sword”) (gladius).

    From Wiktionary