Vang meaning

văng
A rope running from the peak of a gaff to a ship's rail or mast, used to steady the gaff.
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A rope or either of two ropes attached to a gaff and used to control its lateral movement.
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A rope or an arrangement of ropes and pulleys attached to the boom of a fore-and-aft sail and used to hold the boom down and flatten the sail.
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(dialectal, as a godparent) To undertake for at the Font; be godfather or godmother to.
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(nautical) A boom vang, a strap or line which exerts downward pressure on the boom near where it joins the mast of a fore-and-aft rigged sailboat.
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(nautical) A line extended down from the end of a yard or a gaff, used to regulate its position.
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Origin of vang

  • Dutch a catch from vangen to catch pag- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English vangen, southern variant of fangen (“to seize, catch"), from Old English fōn (“to take, grasp, seize, catch, capture, make prisoner, receive, accept, assume, undertake, meet with, encounter"), and Old Norse fanga (“to fetch, capture"), both from Proto-Germanic *fanhanÄ…, *fangōnÄ… (“to catch, capture"), from Proto-Indo-European *paḱ- (“to fasten, place"). Cognate with West Frisian fange (“to catch"), Dutch vangen (“to catch"), German fangen (“to catch"), Danish fange (“to catch"). More at fang.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Dutch vangen (“to catch").
    From Wiktionary