Logic meaning

lŏjĭk
The definition of logic is a science that studies the principles of correct reasoning.

An example of logic is deducing that two truths imply a third truth.

An example of logic is the process of coming to the conclusion of who stole a cookie based on who was in the room at the time.

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The system of principles underlying any art or science.
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The study of the principles of reasoning, especially of the structure of propositions as distinguished from their content and of method and validity in deductive reasoning.
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Way of reasoning, whether correct or incorrect.

To use faulty logic.

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The relationship between elements and between an element and the whole in a set of objects, individuals, principles, or events.

There's a certain logic to the motion of rush-hour traffic.

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The study of the principles of reasoning, especially of the structure of propositions as distinguished from their content and of method and validity in deductive reasoning.
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The systematized interconnection of switching functions, circuits, or devices, as in electronic computers.
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(philosophy, logic) The study of the principles and criteria of valid inference and demonstration.
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Necessary connection or outcome, as through the working of cause and effect.

The logic of events.

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The sequence of operations performed by hardware or software. It is the computer's "intelligence." Hardware logic is contained in the electronic circuits and follows the rules of Boolean logic. Software logic (program logic) is contained in the placement of instructions written by the programmer. Software logic is called "business logic" when it refers to the transactions of the business rather than underlying infrastructure such as the operating system, database management system (DBMS) or network.Logic Is Not LogicalThe term "logic" is not the same as "logical." Logic refers to algorithms and operational sequences; whereas, "logical" refers to a higher-level view of hardware, software or data that is not tied to physical structures (see logical vs. physical). See also logical expression.
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(uncountable) Any system of thought, whether rigorous and productive or not, especially one associated with a particular person.

It's hard to work out his system of logic.

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(intransitive, pejorative) To engage in excessive or inappropriate application of logic.
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(countable, mathematics) A formal or informal language together with a deductive system or a model-theoretic semantics.
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Correct reasoning; valid induction or deduction.

The lack of logic in his scheme.

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(uncountable) The part of a system (usually electronic) that performs the boolean logic operations, short for logic gates or logic circuit.

Fred is designing the logic for the new controller.

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To apply logical reasoning to.
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To overcome by logical argument.
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(uncountable) A method of human thought that involves thinking in a linear, step-by-step manner about how a problem can be solved. Logic is the basis of many principles including the scientific method.
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(uncountable, mathematics) The mathematical study of relationships between rigorously defined concepts and of proof of statements.
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Valid reasoning.

Your paper lacks the logic to prove your thesis.

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Origin of logic

  • Middle English from Old French logique from Latin logica from Greek logikē (tekhnē) (art) of reasoning, logic feminine of logikos of reasoning from logos reason leg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French logike, from Latin logica, from Ancient Greek λογική (logike, “logic"), from properly feminine of λογικός (logikós, “of or pertaining to speech or reason or reasoning, rational, reasonable"), from λόγος (logos, “speech, reason").

    From Wiktionary