Legitimate meaning

lə-jĭtə-mĭt
In accordance with the law or established legal forms and requirements; lawful.
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Born of legally married parents.

Legitimate offspring.

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Legitimate poems of Chaucer; legitimate inscriptions.

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To make legitimate, as:
  • To give legal force or status to; make lawful.
  • To sanction formally or officially; authorize.
  • To demonstrate or declare to be justified.
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Conceived or born of parents legally married to each other.
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Ruling by the rights of heredity.

A legitimate king.

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Conforming to or in accordance with established rules, standards, principles.
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(theater) Designating or of professionally produced stage plays, as distinguished from films, vaudeville, etc.

An actor of the legitimate stage.

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Conforming to known principles, or established or accepted rules or standards; valid.

Legitimate reasoning; a legitimate standard or method.

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Lawfully begotten, i.e., born to a legally married couple.
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Relating to hereditary rights.
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To make legitimate, lawful, or valid; especially, to put in the position or state of a legitimate person before the law, by legal means.
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The definition of legitimate is within the rules, correct or accepted as proper. It also refers to a person whose parents are married when he or she is born.

An example of a legitimate idea is one that is accepted and that scientists can prove.

An example of a legitimate child is someone born to married parents.

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Of, relating to, or ruling by hereditary right.

A legitimate monarch.

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Of or relating to drama of high professional quality that excludes burlesque, vaudeville, and some forms of musical comedy.

The legitimate theater.

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Origin of legitimate

  • Middle English legitimat born in wedlock from Medieval Latin lēgitimātus law-worthy past participle of lēgitimāre to make lawful from Latin lēgitimus legitimate from lēx lēg- law leg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Medieval Latin legitimatus, past participle of legitimo (“make legal").

    From Wiktionary