Period meaning

pîrē-əd
Frequency:
An interval of time characterized by the occurrence of a certain condition, event, or phenomenon.

A period of economic prosperity.

noun
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Any of various arbitrary units of time, especially:
  • Any of the divisions of the academic day.
  • (sports & games) A division of the playing time of a game.
noun
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The full pause at the end of a spoken sentence.
noun
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A sentence of several carefully balanced clauses in formal writing.
noun
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A point or portion of time at which something is ended; a completion or conclusion.
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An interval of time characterized by the prevalence of a specified culture, ideology, or technology.

Artifacts of the pre-Columbian period.

noun
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(physics & astronomy) The time interval between two successive occurrences of a recurrent event or phases of an event; a cycle.

The period of a satellite's orbit.

noun
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An interval regarded as a distinct evolutionary or developmental phase.

Picasso's early career is divided into his blue period and rose period.

noun
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(geology) A unit of time, longer than an epoch and shorter than an era.
noun
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The definition of a period is a space of time between two events or a portion of time.

An example of period is the Renaissance era.

An example of period is the first class of the day.

An example of period is a female's menstrual cycle.

noun
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A punctuation mark (.) indicating a full stop, placed at the end of declarative sentences and other statements thought to be complete, and after many abbreviations.
noun
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(music) A group of two or more phrases within a composition, often made up of 8 or 16 measures and terminating with a cadence.
noun
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(chemistry) A sequence of elements arranged in order of increasing atomic number and forming one of the horizontal rows in the periodic table.
noun
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Of, belonging to, or representing a certain historical age or time.

A period piece; period furniture.

adjective
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Used to emphasize finality, as when expressing a decision or an opinion.

You're not going to the movies tonight, period!

interjection
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The interval between recurrent astronomical events, as between two full moons.
noun
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The interval between certain happenings.

A ten-year period of peace.

noun
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A portion of time, often indefinite, characterized by certain events, processes, conditions, etc.; stage.

A period of change, the present period.

noun
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Any of the portions of time into which an event of fixed duration, as a game or a school day, is divided.
noun
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The full course, or one of the stages, of a disease.
noun
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An occurrence of menstruation; menses.
noun
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An end, completion, or conclusion, or a point of time marking this.

Death put a period to his plans.

noun
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A subdivision of an era in geologic time corresponding to the rock strata of a system.
noun
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(math.) The interval from one repetition to the next of a recurrent or self-duplicating function.
noun
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(music) A group of two or more related phrases ending with a cadence.
noun
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(physics) The interval of time necessary for a regularly recurring motion to make a complete cycle.
noun
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(prosody) A rhythm group of two or more cola in the Greek system.
noun
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Of or like that of a particular or appropriate period or age.

A Victorian house decorated with period furniture, baroque music played on period instruments.

adjective
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(informal) Used to indicate that the preceding statement is the speaker's last, conclusive, word on the subject.

Be home by midnight or you're grounded, period!

interjection
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An interval of time characterized by the occurrence of a certain condition, event, or phenomenon.

A period of economic prosperity.

noun
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One of the stages of a disease.
noun
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(chemistry) A sequence of elements arranged in order of increasing atomic number and forming one of the horizontal rows in the periodic table.
noun
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A division of geologic time that is longer than an epoch and shorter than an era.
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The duration of one cycle of a regularly recurring action or event.
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An occurrence of menstruation.
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In the Periodic Table, any of the seven horizontal rows that contain elements arranged in order of increasing atomic number. All the elements in a particular period have the same number of electron shells in their atoms, equal to the number of the period. Thus, atoms of nickel, copper, and zinc, in period four, each have four electron shells.
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Appropriate for a given historical era.
adjective
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(of a film, or play, or similar) Set in and designed to evoke a particular historical period, especially through the use of elaborate costumes and scenery.
adjective
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(chiefly North America) And nothing else; and nothing less; used for emphasis.

When I say "eat your dinner," it means "eat your dinner," period!

interjection
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An end or conclusion; the final point of a process etc. [from 16th c.]
noun
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A period of time in history seen as a single coherent entity; an epoch, era. [from 16th c.]

Food rationing continued in the post-war period.

noun
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(rhetoric) A complete sentence, especially one expressing a single thought or making a balanced, rhythmic whole. [from 16th c.]
noun
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(now chiefly North America) The punctuation mark “." (indicating the ending of a sentence or marking an abbreviation).
noun
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A length of time. [from 17th c.]

There was a period of confusion following the announcement.

You'll be on probation for a six-month period.

noun
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The length of time during which the same characteristics of a periodic phenomenon recur, such as the repetition of a wave or the rotation of a planet. [from 17th c.]
noun
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Female menstruation. [from 18th c.]

When she is on her period she prefers not to go swimming.

noun
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A section of an artist's, writer's (etc.) career distinguished by a given quality, preoccupation etc. [from 19th c.]

This is one of the last paintings Picasso created during his Blue Period.

noun
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Each of the divisions into which a school day is split, allocated to a given subject or activity. [from 19th c.]

I have math class in second period.

noun
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(chiefly North America) Each of the intervals into which various sporting events are divided. [from 19th c.]

Gretzky scored in the last minute of the second period.

noun
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(chemistry) A row in the periodic table of the elements. [from 19th c.]
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(geology) A subdivision of an era, typically lasting from tens to hundreds of millions of years, see Appendix: Geologic timescale.
noun
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(genetics) A Drosophila gene which gene product is involved in regulation of the circadian rhythm.
noun
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(music) Two phrases (an antecedent and a consequent phrase).
noun
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(mathematics) One of several similar sets of figures or terms usually marked by points or commas placed at regular intervals, as in numeration, in the extraction of roots, and in recurring decimals.
noun
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To put an end to.

verb
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Origin of period

  • Middle English periode from Old French from Medieval Latin periodus from Latin perihodos rhetorical period from Greek periodos circuit peri- peri- hodos way

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English periode, from Middle French periode, from Medieval Latin periodus, from Ancient Greek περίοδος (períodos, “circuit, period of time, path around"), from περί- (peri-, “around") + ὁδός (hodós, “way"). Displaced native Middle English tide (“interval, period, season"), from Old English tÄ«d (“time, period, season"), Middle English elde (“age, period"), from Old English ieldu (“age, period of time").

    From Wiktionary