Very definitions

vĕr'ē
Complete; absolute.

At the very end of his career.

adjective
96
1
Being the same; identical.

That is the very question she asked yesterday.

adjective
93
0
Being particularly suitable or appropriate.

The very item needed to increase sales.

adjective
90
1
Used to emphasize the importance of what is specified.

The very mountains shook.

adjective
87
0
Being nothing more than what is specified; mere.

The very act of riding in the car made him dizzy.

adjective
84
1
Genuine; true.
adjective
81
1
In a high degree; extremely.

Very happy; very much admired.

adverb
78
1
Truly; absolutely.

The very best advice; attended the very same schools.

adverb
75
2
Used in titles.

The Very Reverend Jane Smith.

adverb
72
1
In the fullest sense; complete; absolute.

The very opposite of the truth.

adjective
67
1
Same; identical.

The very hat he lost.

adjective
64
3
Being just what is needed or suitable.

The very sofa to fit into the space.

adjective
61
0
Actual [caught in the very act]
adjective
58
1
In a high degree; to a great extent; extremely; exceedingly.
adverb
55
1
Truly; really.

The very same man.

adverb
52
1
To what is regarded as an extreme, and hence obvious, degree; obviously; unmistakably.

Very pregnant.

adverb
49
1
The definition of very is something complete or something identical.

An example of very is the absolute end of a story.

adjective
15
0
Very is defined as extremely or really.

An example of very is someone saying they are extra happy.

adverb
12
0

The fierce hatred of a very woman.

The very blood and bone of our grammar.

He tried his very best.

adjective
2
0

He proposed marriage in the same restaurant, at the very table where they first met.

That's the very tool that I need.

adjective
2
0
With limiting effect: mere.
adjective
0
0

You're very tall.

adverb
0
0

He was the very best runner there.

adverb
0
0

Origin of very

From Middle English verray, verrai (“true"), from Old French verai (“true") (Modern French: vrai), from assumed Vulgar Latin *vÄ“rācus, alteration of Latin vÄ“rāx (“truthful"), from Latin vÄ“rus (“true"), from Proto-Indo-European *wÄ“r- (“true, benevolent"). Cognate with Old English wÇ£r (“true, correct"), Dutch waar (“true"), German wahr (“true"), Icelandic alvöru (“earnest"). Displaced native Middle English sore, sār (“very") (from Old English sār (“grievous, extreme") (Cf. German: sehr, Dutch: zeer), Middle English wel (“very") (from Old English wel (“well, very")), and Middle English swith (“quickly; very") (from Old English swīþe (“very"). More at warlock.