Too definition

to͝o
More than enough; excessively.

She worries too much.

adverb
27
7
In addition; also.

He's coming along too.

adverb
21
4
Very; extremely; immensely.

He's only too willing to be of service.

adverb
9
4
In addition; as well; besides; also.
adverb
9
4
Extremely; very.

It was just too delicious!

adverb
3
0
Advertisement
More than enough; superfluously; overly.

The hat is too big.

adverb
2
1
Too is defined as also or in addition. It can also refer to something done to an excessive degree.

An example of too is when you also want to go along with your friends.

An example of too is when you eat more than you should.

adverb
1
0
(focus) Likewise.
adverb
1
0
(conjunctive) Also; in addition.
adverb
1
0
(degree) To an excessive degree; over; more than enough.
adverb
1
0
Advertisement
(degree, colloquial) To a high degree, very.

She doesn't talk too much; I'm not too sure about this.

adverb
1
0
(affirmation, colloquial) Used to contradict a negative assertion.

You're not old enough yet. I am, too!

adverb
1
0
(informal) Indeed; so.

You will too do it!

adverb
8
8
To a regrettable extent.

That's too bad!

adverb
3
3
To a regrettable degree.

My error was all too apparent.

adverb
2
2
Advertisement

Origin of too

  • Middle English to from Old English to, furthermore de- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English to (“also, in addition to"), from Old English (“furthermore, also, besides"), adverbial use of preposition (“to, into"). The sense of "in addition, also" deriving from the original meaning of "apart, separately" (compare Old English prefix tō- (“apart")). More at to.

    From Wiktionary