Serene meaning

sə-rēn'
adjective
1
0
Content or composed; untroubled.
adjective
1
1
Unclouded; fair.

Serene skies and a bright blue sea.

adjective
1
1
The definition of serene is untroubled, or is the title for a high-ranking member of royalty.

An example of something serene is a calm day spent floating in a boat.

The sleeping cat is an example of something serene.

Referring to Queen Elizabeth as Her Serene Highness is an example of serene.

adjective
0
0
Unaffected by disturbance; calm or peaceful.

A serene forest.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Clear; bright; unclouded.

A serene sky.

adjective
0
0
Not disturbed or troubled; calm, peaceful, tranquil, etc.
adjective
0
0
Exalted; high-ranking.

His Serene Highness.

adjective
0
0
A serene expanse, as of sky or water.
noun
0
0

She looked at her students with joviality and a serene mentality.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
(archaic) Fair and unclouded (as of the sky); clear; unobscured.
adjective
0
0
Used as part of certain titles.

Her Serene Highness.

adjective
0
0
To make serene.

Heaven and earth, as if contending, vie / To raise his being, and serene his soul. "” Thomson.

verb
0
0
Evening air; night chill.
noun
0
0
A fine rain from a cloudless sky after sunset.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A female given name. A rare variant of Serena.
pronoun
0
0
Used as a title and form of address for certain members of royalty.

Her Serene Highness; His Serene Highness.

adjective
0
1
(poetic) Serenity; clearness; calmness.
noun
0
1

Origin of serene

  • Middle English from Latin serēnus serene, clear
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Old French serein (“evening"), Vulgar Latin *serānum "” from substantive use of sÄ“rum, neuter of sÄ“rus (“late") + -ānus suffix.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English, from Latin serÄ“nus (“clear, cloudless, untroubled").
    From Wiktionary