Easy meaning

ēzē
Free from worry, anxiety, trouble, or pain.

My mind was easy, knowing that I had done my best.

adjective
17
2
Requiring or exhibiting little effort or endeavor; undemanding.

Took the easy way out of her problems; wasn't satisfied with easy answers.

adjective
8
3
Causing little hardship or distress.

An easy penalty; a habit that isn't easy to give up.

adjective
7
4
Socially at ease.

An easy, good-natured manner.

adjective
6
3
Free from trouble, anxiety, pain, etc.

An easy life.

adjective
3
1
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(informal) Consenting to sexual activity readily and, usually, indiscriminately.
adjective
2
4
In a restrained or moderate manner.

Go easy on the butter.

adverb
1
0
Without much hardship or cost.

Got off easy with only a small fine.

adverb
1
0
The definition of easy is something that can be done with ease, is not hurried, is not difficult, is free from anxiety or is comfortable.

An example of easy is cooking a meal without the pressure of time.

An example of easy is a hike that continues at the same elevation.

An example of easy is a big cozy reclining chair.

adjective
0
0
Readily exploited, imposed on, or tricked.

An easy mark; an easy victim.

adjective
0
0
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Not steep or abrupt; gradual.

An easy climb.

adjective
0
0
Promiscuous; loose.
adjective
0
0
Without haste or agitation.

Relax and take it easy for a while.

adverb
0
0
With little effort; easily.

Success that came too easy.

adverb
0
0
Conducive to comfort or rest; comfortable.

An easy carriage.

adjective
0
0
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Fond of comfort, ease, or idleness.
adjective
0
0
Free from constraint; not stiff, awkward, or embarrassed.

An easy manner.

adjective
0
0
Not strict, harsh, or severe; lenient.

Easy terms.

adjective
0
0
Readily influenced; compliant or credulous.

An easy mark.

adjective
0
0
Easily.
adverb
0
0
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Slowly and carefully.
adverb
0
0
(now rare except in certain expressions) Comfortable; at ease.

In the middle of the room was a fluffy easy chair. Now that I know it's taken care of, I can rest easy at night.

adjective
0
0
Requiring little skill or effort.

It's often easy to wake up but hard to get up.

The teacher gave an easy test to her students.

adjective
0
0
In a relaxed or casual manner.

'After his illness, John decided to take it easy.

adverb
0
0
In a manner without strictness or harshness.

Jane went easier on him after he broke his arm.

adverb
0
0
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Used an intensifier for large magnitudes.

This project will cost 15 million dollars, easy.

adverb
0
0
Not difficult, not hard.
adverb
0
0
(informal, pejorative, of a person) Consenting readily to sex.

He has a reputation for being easy; they say he slept with half the senior class.

adjective
0
1
(informal) easy as pie
  • Capable of being accomplished or done with no difficulty.
idiom
1
0
easy come, easy go
  • gotten and spent or lost with equal ease
idiom
0
0
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easy does it!
  • be careful! go slowly! etc.
idiom
0
0
easy on the eyes
  • pleasant to look at; attractive
idiom
0
0
(informal) go easy on
  • to use or consume with restraint
    go easy on the table salt.
  • to deal with leniently
    To go easy on traffic violators.
idiom
0
0
have got it easy
  • to be in comfortable, relatively carefree circumstances
idiom
0
0
(informal) take it easy
  • to refrain from anger, haste, etc.
  • to refrain from hard work; relax; rest
idiom
0
0
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Other Word Forms

Adjective

Base Form:
easy
Comparative
easiest
Superlative
easiest

Origin of easy

  • Middle English esi from Old French aaisie past participle of aaisier to put at ease a- to (from Latin ad- ad-) aise ease ease

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English eesy, esy, partly from Middle English ese (“ease”) + -y, equivalent to ease +‎ -y, and partly from Old French aisié (“eased, at ease, at leisure”), past participle of aisier (“to put at ease”), from aise (“empty space, elbow room, opportunity”), of uncertain origin. See ease. Merged with Middle English ethe, eathe (“not difficult, easy”), from Old English ēaþe, īeþe (“easy, smooth, not difficult”), from Proto-Germanic *auþaz, *auþijaz (“easy, pleasing”), from *auþiz (“vacant, empty”), from Proto-Indo-European *aut- (“empty, lonely”). Compare also Old Saxon ōþi (“easy, vacant, empty”), Old High German ōdi (“easy, effortless, vacant, empty”), Old Norse auðr (“easy, vacant, empty”). More at ease, eath.

    From Wiktionary