Cavalier meaning

kăvə-lîr
Showing arrogant or offhand disregard; dismissive.

A cavalier attitude toward the suffering of others.

adjective
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1
Not caring enough about something important.

The very dignified officials were confused by his cavalier manner.

adjective
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1
The definition of cavalier is an arrogant person or someone indifferent or casual about important matters.

An example of cavalier is someone not really caring about receiving an eviction notice.

adjective
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1
A sprightly, military man; hence, a gallant.
noun
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1
A gallant or chivalrous man, especially one serving as escort to a woman of high social position; a gentleman.
noun
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A mounted soldier; a knight.
noun
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A cavalier is defined as a knight or a courteous gentleman.

An example of cavalier is Sir Lancelot.

noun
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2
A gallant or courteous gentleman, esp. one serving as a lady's escort.
noun
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2
Carefree and nonchalant; jaunty.
adjective
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A military man serving on horse.
noun
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A partisan of Charles I of England in his struggles with Parliament (1641-49); Royalist.
noun
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A supporter of Charles I of England in his struggles against Parliament.
noun
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A work of more than ordinary height, rising from the level ground of a bastion, etc., and overlooking surrounding parts.
noun
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An armed horseman; knight.
noun
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1
A well mannered man; a gentleman.
noun
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2
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Of or relating to a group of 17th-century English poets associated with the court of Charles I.
adjective
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adjective
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Of or pertaining to the party of King Charles I.
adjective
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One of the court party in the time of King Charles I, as contrasted with a Roundhead or an adherent of Parliament.
noun
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Origin of cavalier

  • French horseman from Old Italian cavaliere from Late Latin caballārius from Latin caballus horse

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 1589, from Middle French cavalier 'horseman', from Old Italian cavaliere (“mounted soldier, knight”), from Old Provençal cavalier, from Late Latin caballārius (“horseman”), from Latin caballus (“horse”), from Gaulish caballos 'nag', variant of cabillos (compare Welsh ceffyl, Breton kefel, Irish capall), akin to German (Swabish) Kōb 'nag' and Old Church Slavonic kobyla 'mare'.

    From Wiktionary

  • Previous English forms include cavalero, cavaliero.

    From Wiktionary