Fine meaning

fīn
Fine is defined as money charged to a person for doing something wrong, such as breaking the speed limit.

An example of a fine is when you have to pay $50 for getting a speeding ticket.

noun
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Consisting of very small particles; not coarse.

Fine dust.

adjective
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Very sharp; keen.

A blade with a fine edge.

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Carefully or delicately made or done.

Fine china.

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(informal) Very well; all right.
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The definition of fine is the end of something.

An example of fine in musical terms is the phrase "fine" printed at the end of a piece of music.

noun
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Thin; slender.

Fine hairs.

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Trained to the highest degree of physical efficiency.

A fine racehorse.

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Characterized by refinement or elegance.

People in the finest society.

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Satisfactory; acceptable.

Handing in your paper on Monday is fine.

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Being in a state of satisfactory health; quite well.

“How are you?” “I'm fine.”

adjective
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Used as an intensive.

A fine mess.

adjective
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Finely.
adverb
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(informal) Very well.

Doing fine.

adverb
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To make or become finer, purer, or cleaner.
verb
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A sum of money required to be paid especially to the government as a penalty for an offense.
noun
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(obsolete) An end; a termination.
noun
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To require the payment of a fine from; impose a fine on.
verb
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The end.
noun
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(obs.) Finished; perfected.
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Superior in quality; better than average; excellent; very good.

A fine sample.

adjective
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Of exceptional character or ability.

A fine teacher.

adjective
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With no impurities; refined.
adjective
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Containing a specified proportion of pure metal.
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In good health; very well.
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Clear and bright.
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Sharp; keen.

A knife with a fine edge.

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Of delicate or subtle composition or character.

Fine lace.

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(now rare) Attractive; handsome.

A fine child.

adjective
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Trained and developed physically to the maximum extent.
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Acceptable; satisfactory.
adjective
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adverb
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To make or become fine or finer.
verb
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A finish; end; conclusion: obs. except in in fine (see phrase below)
noun
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A sum of money paid to settle a matter; esp., a sum required to be paid as punishment or penalty for an offense.
noun
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To require the payment of a fine from.
verb
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(musical direction) The end: a note marking the close of a repetition.
noun
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An amount of money paid as a penalty for a criminal or civil infraction.
noun
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Of subjective quality.
  • Of superior quality.
    The tree frog that they encountered was truly a fine specimen. Only a really fine wine could fully complement Lucía's hand-made pasta.
  • (informal) Being acceptable, adequate, passable, or satisfactory.
    "How are you today?" "Fine." "Will this one do? It's got a dent in it" "Yeah, it'll be fine, I guess." "It's fine with me if you stay out late, so long as you're back by three.".
  • (informal) Good-looking, attractive.
    "That man is so fine that I'd jump into his pants without a moment's hesitation.".
  • Subtle, delicately balanced.
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Delicate; subtle; exquisite; artful; dexterous.
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Of objective quality.
  • Of a particular grade of quality, usually between very good and very fine, and below mint.
    The small scratch meant that his copy of X-Men #2 was merely fine when it otherwise would have been near mint.
  • (of weather) Sunny and not raining.
  • Consisting of especially minute particulate; made up of particularly small pieces.
    Grind it into a fine powder. When she touched the artifact, it collapsed into a heap of fine dust.
  • Particularly slender; especially thin, narrow, or of small girth.
    The threads were so fine that you had to look through a magnifying glass to see them.
  • Made of slender or thin filaments.
    They protected themselves from the small parasites with a fine wire mesh.
  • Having a (specified) proportion of pure metal in its composition.
    Coins nine tenths fine.
adjective
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(cricket) Behind the batsman and at a small angle to the line between the wickets.

[…] to nudge it through the covers (tickle it down to fine leg) for a four […]

adjective
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Expression of agreement.
adverb
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Well, nicely, in a positive way.

Everything worked out fine.

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Fine champagne; French brandy.
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(usually in the plural) Something that is fine; fine particles.
noun
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To make finer, purer, or cleaner; to purify or clarify.

To fine gold.

verb
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(intransitive) To become finer, purer, or cleaner.
verb
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To make finer, or less coarse, as in bulk, texture, etc.

To fine the soil.

verb
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To change by fine gradations.

To fine down a ship's lines, i.e. to diminish her lines gradually.

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To clarify (wine and beer) by filtration.
verb
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A fee levied as punishment for breaking the law.
noun
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To issue a fine as punishment to (someone).
verb
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(intransitive) To pay a fine.
verb
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(music) The end of a musical composition.
noun
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(music) The location in a musical score that indicates the end of the piece, particularly when the piece ends somewhere in the middle of the score due to a section of the music being repeated.
noun
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(obsolete, intransitive) To finish; to cease.
verb
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(obsolete) To cause to cease; to stop.
verb
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Shakespeare.

Is this the fine of his fines?

noun
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A final agreement concerning lands or rents between persons, as the lord and his vassal.

noun
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(UK, law) A sum of money or price paid for obtaining a benefit, favor, or privilege, as for admission to a copyhold, or for obtaining or renewing a lease.
noun
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Very small in size, weight, or thickness.

Fine type; fine paper.

adjective
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in fine
  • In conclusion; finally.
  • In summation; in brief.
idiom
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in fine
  • in conclusion
  • in brief
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of fine

  • Middle English fin from Old French settlement, compensation from Medieval Latin fīnis from Latin end

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English fin from Old French from Latin fīnis end, supreme degree

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Italian from Latin fīnis end

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fin, from Old French fin (“fine, minute, exact”), probably, from Latin finitus (“literally finished (used as an adjective by Cicero, of words, well rounded)”), past participle of fīnīre (“to limit, bound, define, terminate, finish”), from finis (“a limit, end”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old French fin (“end”), from Medieval Latin finis (“a payment in settlement or tax”)

    From Wiktionary

  • Old French finer, French finir. See finish (transitive verb).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Italian fine ("end").

    From Wiktionary