Awkward meaning

ôkwərd
Showing or resulting from lack of social poise; embarrassed or embarrassing.

An awkward remark.

adjective
19
1
Not having grace or skill; clumsy, as in form or movement; bungling.

An awkward dancer, an awkward style.

adjective
15
4
Not graceful; ungainly.
adjective
12
4
Inconvenient to use; hard to handle; unwieldy.

An awkward tool.

adjective
11
0
Not easy to deal with; delicate.

An awkward situation.

adjective
7
0
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Inconvenient; uncomfortable; cramped.

An awkward position.

adjective
4
2
(obs.) Perverse or untoward.
adjective
2
1
The definition of awkward is someone who is clumsy or a situation which is uncomfortable.

A person who is uncoordinated is an example of a person who is awkward.

If you are with someone and neither of you can think of anything to say, that is an example of an awkward silence.

adjective
0
0
(obsolete) In a backwards direction.
adverb
0
0
Lacking dexterity in the use of the hands, or of instruments.

John was awkward at performing the trick. He'll have to practice to improve.

adjective
0
0
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Not easily managed or effected; embarrassing.

That was an extremely awkward moment. Everyone was watching.

adjective
0
0
Lacking social skills, or uncomfortable with social interaction.

I'm very awkward at parties.

Things get very awkward whenever 60-year old men use cheesy pick-up lines on me.

adjective
0
0
Perverse; adverse; difficult to handle.

He's a right awkward chap.

These cabinets are going to be very awkward when we move.

adjective
0
0

Origin of awkward

  • Middle English awkeward in the wrong way awke wrong (from Old Norse öfugr backward apo- in Indo-European roots) -ward -ward

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From awk (“odd, clumsy”) +‎ -ward.

    From Wiktionary