Tender meaning

tĕndər
Tender is a person who takes care of someone or something.

An example of tender is a shepherd to his flock.

noun
19
5
To offer formally.

Tender a letter of resignation.

verb
15
4
Frail; delicate.
adjective
8
1
Sensitive to frost or severe cold; not hardy.

Tender green shoots.

adjective
8
1
Young and vulnerable.

Of tender age.

adjective
6
1
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Gentle, mild, or light; not rough or heavy.

A tender touch.

adjective
3
0
One who tends something.

A lathe tender.

noun
2
0
(nautical) A vessel attendant on other vessels, especially one that ferries supplies between ship and shore.
noun
2
0
That requires careful handling; ticklish; delicate.

A tender question.

adjective
2
0
To make tender.
verb
1
0
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(law) To offer (payment or performance) pursuant to an obligation.
verb
1
0
A railroad car attached to the rear of a locomotive and designed to carry fuel and water.
noun
1
0
Weak of constitution or physique; unable to endure pain, hardship, etc.; feeble; frail.
adjective
1
0
Having weakness due to youth; immature; young.

The tender years.

adjective
1
0
Of soft quality or delicate tone; subdued.

Tender colors.

adjective
1
0
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Sparing; chary.

Tender of one's praise.

adjective
1
0
Giving physical pain, as from overuse or when not fully healed; painful; hurting.

A tender pitching arm.

adjective
1
0
(naut.) Tending to lean to one side too easily when under sail.
adjective
1
0
Physically weak; not able to endure hardship.
adjective
1
0
(nautical) Likely to heel easily under sail; crank.
adjective
1
1
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Soft or delicate and easily chewed, broken, cut, etc.; fragile, succulent, etc.
adjective
1
1
To make tender.
verb
0
0
(archaic) To treat with tenderness.
verb
0
0
To offer in payment of an obligation.
verb
0
0
To present for acceptance; offer.

To tender an invitation, apology, etc.

verb
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To submit as a tender.

To tender a bid.

verb
0
0
An offer of money, services, etc. made to satisfy an obligation, avoid legal action, etc.
noun
0
0
A formal offer, as a proposal of marriage, a bid stating terms of a contract, or a bid on a printed form submitted to buy securities at a certain price.
noun
0
0
Something offered in payment, esp. money.
noun
0
0
A person who tends, or has charge of, something.
noun
0
0
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A railroad car carrying fuel and water for a steam locomotive, to the rear of which it is attached.
noun
0
0
A strip of meat, as from the tenderloin; esp., a strip of chicken breast, often served breaded and fried or baked.
noun
0
0
An unconditional offer of performance in order to satisfy a debt. It may be offered to save the party making the tender from a penalty for nonpayment or lack of performance. On the other hand, if the other party should refuse the tender without a justifiable reason, that party may be placed in default.
noun
0
0
Something offered in order to settle a debt or obligation.
noun
0
0
An offer put forward in hope of acceptance.
noun
0
0
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Something that serves as a means of payment, such as banknotes or coin (as in, legal tender).
noun
0
0
The placement by a seller at the disposal of the buyer, that is, arranging delivery of those paid for goods in a timely manner.
0
0
Sensitive or painful to the touch.
adjective
0
0
Easily bruised or injured; not firm or hard; delicate.

Tender plants; tender flesh; tender fruit.

adjective
0
0
(of food) Soft and easily chewed.
adjective
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0
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Sensible to impression and pain; easily pained.
adjective
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0

Suzanne was such a tender and sweet mother to her children.

adjective
0
0
Adapted to excite feeling or sympathy; expressive of the softer passions; pathetic.

Tender expressions; tender expostulations; a tender strain.

adjective
0
0
Apt to give pain; causing grief or pain; delicate.

A tender subject.

adjective
0
0
(nautical) Heeling over too easily when under sail; said of a vessel.
adjective
0
0
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Tillotson.

The civil authority should be tender of the honour of God and religion.

adjective
0
0
(now rare) To make tender or delicate; to weaken.
verb
0
0
To feel tenderly towards; to regard fondly.
verb
0
0
The inner flight muscle (pectoralis min) of poultry.
noun
0
0
A railroad car towed behind a steam engine to carry fuel and water.
noun
0
0
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(nautical) A naval ship that functions as a mobile base for other ships.

Submarine tender.

Destroyer tender.

noun
0
0
(formal) To offer, to give.

To tender one's resignation.

verb
0
0
To offer a payment, as at sales or auctions.

In business law, a tender offer is an invitation to shareholders of a corporation to tender, or exchange, their shares in return for a monetary buy-out.

verb
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0
A means of payment such as a check or cheque, cash or credit card.

Your credit card has been declined. You need to provide some other tender such as cash.

noun
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0
(law) A formal offer to buy or sell something.

We will submit our tender to you within the week.

noun
0
0
Any offer or proposal made for acceptance.
noun
0
0
The definition of tender is easy to chew or being delicate or soft in action.

An example of tender is a piece of steak that is not tough.

An example of tender is the way in which a mother gently rubs her baby's back.

adjective
0
1
A strip of meat, usually chicken, often breaded, deep-fried, and served with a sauce.
noun
0
1
A formal offer, as:
  • (law) An offer to pay the amount due under a debt or obligation.
  • A written offer to contract goods or services at a specified cost or rate; a bid.
noun
0
1
Something, especially money, offered in payment.
noun
0
1
(nautical) A smaller boat used for transportation between a large ship and the shore.
noun
0
1

Origin of tender

  • From French tendre to offer from Old French from Latin tendere to hold forth, extend ten- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French tendre from Latin tener ten- in Indo-European roots N., possibly short for tenderloin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French tendre, from Latin tener (“soft, delicate").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle French tendre (“stretch out").

    From Wiktionary

  • From tend +"Ž -er.

    From Wiktionary