Overture definitions

ō'vər-cho͝or'
An introductory section or part, as of a poem; a prelude.
noun
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An act, offer, or proposal that indicates readiness to undertake a course of action or open a relationship.
noun
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An introductory proposal or offer; indication of willingness to negotiate.
noun
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To present as an introduction or proposal.
verb
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In Presbyterian churches, a proposal or question submitted as by the general assembly to the presbyteries.
noun
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To present or make an offer or proposal to.
verb
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Any introductory section.
noun
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To present as an overture.
verb
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An overture is defined as the musical opening to an opera or classical concert.

An example of an overture is the opening piece of music to Mozart's opera The Marriage of Figaro.

noun
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The definition of an overture is an introduction, or an action that shows someone might be ready to take a certain action.

An example of an overture is a suggestion that two people in disagreement seek mediation.

noun
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A pioneer in keyword advertising on the Web. Founded in 1997 as GoTo.com, Pasadena, California-based Overture Services was one of the first Web search engines that included relevant ads on the results page based on the words being searched. If the user clicked an ad, the advertiser was charged the amount it bid for placement. The amount was also displayed, allowing competitors to bid more and move higher on the results page.In early 2003, Overture acquired the AltaVista and AlltheWeb search engines (AltaVista was one of the first search engines on the Web). In late 2003, Overture became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Yahoo! and was renamed Yahoo! Search Marketing in 2005. See keyword advertising.
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(often in plural) An approach or proposal made to initiate communication, establish a relationship etc. [from 15th c.]
noun
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(Scotland) A motion placed before a legislative body, such as the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. [from 16th c.]
noun
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(music) A musical introduction to a piece of music. [from 17th c.]
noun
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Origin of overture

Middle English opening from Old French from Vulgar Latin ōpertūra alteration (influenced by Latin cōperīre to cover) of Latin apertūra from apertus past participle of aperīre to open wer-4 in Indo-European roots