Introduction meaning

ĭn'trə-dŭk'shən
Introduction is defined as the beginning of a book, movie, speech or piece of music.

An example of an introduction is when you have a section in a book before the first chapter.

noun
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Something spoken, written, or otherwise presented in beginning or introducing something, especially:
  • A preface, as to a book.
  • A short preliminary passage in a larger movement or work.
  • A basic introductory text or course of study.
noun
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10
The definition of introduction is making something known for the first time, or formally telling two people who the other person is.

An example of introduction is when you create a new product and tell customers about it in a commercial.

An example of introduction is when you are at a party and you bring your husband and friend together and say "Mark, this is Judy. Judy, this is Mark."

noun
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A means, such as a personal letter, of presenting one person to another.
noun
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Something recently introduced; an innovation.
noun
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The act or process of introducing or the state of being introduced.
noun
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An initial section of a book or article, which introduces the subject material.
noun
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An introducing or being introduced.
noun
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Anything introduced, or brought into use, knowledge, or fashion.
noun
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A means, such as a personal letter, of presenting one person to another.
noun
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Anything that introduces, or prepares the way for.
  • The preliminary section of a book, often having material considered essential to an understanding of the main text.
  • The preliminary part of a speech, treatise, etc.
  • An opening section of a musical composition.
  • A preliminary guide or text.
noun
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The formal presentation of one person to another, to an audience, to society, etc.
noun
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The act or process of introducing.
noun
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Origin of introduction

  • Middle English introduccioun from Old French introduction from Latin intrōductiō intrōductiōn- from intrōductus past participle of intrōdūcere to bring in introduce
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French introduction, from Latin (ultimately intrōdūcō), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁énteros (“inner, what is inside”) and Proto-Indo-European *dewk-.
    From Wiktionary