Survey meaning

sər-vā, sûrvā
A detailed study or inspection, as by gathering information through observations, questionnaires, etc. and analyzing it.
noun
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4
The definition of survey is to carefully review, make a detailed report of, or measure a piece of land to find out its boundaries.

An example of survey is a detective going over every detail of a police report.

An example of survey is a detective making a detailed report of a criminal case.

An example of survey is tract home developer measuring the distance of a piece of land to determine house lot sizes.

verb
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2
To conduct a statistical survey on.

Surveyed the students for music preferences.

verb
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4
A survey is defined as a thorough examination, or the process of measuring land in order to find out its boundaries.

An example of a survey is a company asking people on the street to do a taste test of two different sodas to help with product development.

An example of a survey is the result of someone measuring a piece of property to determine its lot size.

noun
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5
A document reporting the results of a survey.
noun
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5
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(chiefly british) To inspect and determine the structural condition of (a building).
verb
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To make a survey.
verb
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2
To determine the location, form, or boundaries of (a tract of land) by measuring the lines and angles in accordance with the principles of geometry and trigonometry.
verb
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2
To examine for some specific purpose; inspect or consider carefully; review in detail.
verb
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To look at or consider, esp. in a general or comprehensive way; view.
verb
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To make a survey of.
verb
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To survey land.
verb
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A general view; comprehensive study or examination.

A survey of Italian art.

noun
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The act of surveying; a general view, as from above.

"Under his proud survey the city lies." -Sir John Denham.

noun
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A particular view; an examination, especially an official examination, of all the parts or particulars of a thing, with a design to ascertain the condition, quantity, or quality; as, a survey of the stores of a ship; a survey of roads and bridges; a survey of buildings.
noun
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The operation of finding the contour, dimensions, position, or other particulars of, as any part of the earth's surface, whether land or water; also, a measured plan and description of any portion of country, or of a road or line through it.
noun
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To inspect, or take a view of; to view with attention, as from a high place; to overlook; as, to stand on a hill, and survey the surrounding country.

"Round he surveys and well might, where he stood, So high above." -John Milton.

verb
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To view with a scrutinizing eye; to examine.

"With such altered looks. . . All pale and speechless, he surveyed me round." -John Dryden.

verb
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To examine with reference to condition, situation, value, etc.; to examine and ascertain the state of; as, to survey a building in order to determine its value and exposure to loss by fire.
verb
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To determine the form, extent, position, etc., of, as a tract of land, a coast, harbor, or the like, by means of linear and angular measurements, and the application of the principles of geometry and trigonometry; as, to survey land or a coast.
verb
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To examine and ascertain, as the boundaries and royalties of a manor, the tenure of the tenants, and the rent and value of the same.

verb
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To dispose of after determining that something is no longer useful for its intended purpose (military) "Surveyed Old Rope." -William Bligh.
verb
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To determine the boundaries, area, or elevations of (land or structures on the earth's surface) by means of measuring angles and distances, using the techniques of geometry and trigonometry.
verb
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1
A gathering of a sample of data or opinions considered to be representative of a whole.
noun
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1

Origin of survey

  • Middle English surveien from Old French surveeir from Medieval Latin supervidēre Latin super- super- Latin vidēre to look weid- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French sourveoir, surveer, from sour-, sur- (“over") + veoir, veeir (“to see"), from Latin videre. See sur- and vision.

    From Wiktionary