Trumpet meaning

trŭmpĭt
A resounding call, as that of the elephant.
noun
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To play a trumpet.
verb
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An organ stop that produces a tone like that of the brass instrument.
noun
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To sound or proclaim loudly.
verb
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To blow a trumpet.
verb
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To make a sound like a trumpet.
verb
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To sound on a trumpet.
verb
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To sound or utter with a trumpetlike tone.
verb
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A musical instrument of the brass family, generally tuned to the key of B-flat.

The royal herald sounded a trumpet to announce their arrival.

noun
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(intransitive) To play the trumpet.

Cedric made a living trumpeting for the change of passersby in the subway.

verb
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Andy trumpeted Jane's secret across the school, much to her embarrassment.

verb
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A brass instrument with a bright tone, consisting of a tube in an oblong loop or loops, with a flared bell and, in the modern instrument, three valves for producing changes in pitch.
noun
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To give forth a resounding call.
verb
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Something shaped like a trumpet; esp., ear trumpet.
noun
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A pitcher plant (Sarracenia flava) of the SE U.S., with slender, erect, hollow leaves.
noun
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A sound like that of a trumpet; specif., the reverberating call of an elephant.
noun
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A trumpet-toned organ stop.
noun
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To proclaim loudly or widely.
verb
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In an orchestra or other musical group, a musician that plays the trumpet.

The trumpets were assigned to stand at the rear of the orchestra pit.

noun
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The cry of an elephant.

The large bull gave a basso trumpet as he charged the hunters.

noun
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(figuratively) One who praises, or propagates praise, or is the instrument of propagating it.

noun
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A funnel, or short flaring pipe, used as a guide or conductor, as for yarn in a knitting machine.
noun
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(intransitive) To sound loudly, be amplified.

The music trumpeted from the speakers, hurting my ears.

verb
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(intransitive) Of an elephant, to make its cry.

The circus trainer cracked the whip, signaling the elephant to trumpet.

verb
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Origin of trumpet

  • Middle English trumpette from Old French trompette diminutive of trompe horn from Old High German trumpa

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English trumpette, trompette (“trumpet") from Old French trompette (“trumpet"), diminutive of trompe (“horn, trump, trumpet"), from Frankish *trumpa, *trumba (“trumpet"). Akin to Old High German trumpa, trumba (“horn, trumpet"), Middle Dutch tromme (“drum"), Middle Low German trumme (“drum"). More at drum.

    From Wiktionary