Bugle meaning

byo͝o'gəl
To bugle is defined as to play a bugle.

An example of bugle is to blow on a short brass horn.

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The definition of a bugle is a brass horn instrument like a trumpet without keys or valves.

An example of a bugle is what is played on a military base to wake the trainees.

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A brass instrument somewhat shorter than a trumpet and lacking keys or valves.
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The loud resonant call of an animal, especially a male elk during rutting season.
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To sound a bugle.
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To produce a loud resonant call, as of a rutting male elk.
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A tubular glass or plastic bead that is used to trim clothing.
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Any of several creeping Old World herbs of the genus Ajuga in the mint family, having opposite leaves, square stems, and terminal spikes of purplish to white flowers.
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A brass instrument like a trumpet but smaller, and usually without keys or valves: used chiefly for military calls and signals.
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To call or signal by or as by blowing a bugle.
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A long, tubular glass or plastic bead for trimming dresses, etc.
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Trimmed with bugles.
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Any of a genus (Ajuga) of plants of the mint family, having spikes of white, pink, or blue flowers and often used for ground cover; ajuga.
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A horn used by hunters.
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(music) A simple brass instrument consisting of a horn with no valves, playing only pitches in its harmonic series.
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An often-cultivated plant in the family Lamiaceae.
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Anything shaped like a bugle, round or conical and having a bell on one end.
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To announce, sing, or cry in the manner of a musical bugle.
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A tubular glass or plastic bead sewn onto clothes as a decorative trim.
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A sort of wild ox; a buffalo.

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Origin of bugle

  • Middle English wild ox, hunting horn made from the horn of a wild ox from Old French steer from Latin būculus diminutive of bōs ox gwou- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old French from Late Latin būgula (perhaps influenced by būglōssa bugloss) from Latin būgillō
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Anglo-Norman, from Old French, from Latin buculus (“young bull; ox; steer”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Late Latin bugulus (“a woman's ornament”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English
    From Wiktionary