Herald meaning

hĕrəld
One that gives a sign or indication of something to come; a harbinger.

The crocus is a herald of spring.

noun
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An official whose specialty is heraldry.
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(historical) Any of various officials who made proclamations, carried state messages to other sovereigns, took charge of tournaments, arranged ceremonies, etc.
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A person who proclaims or announces significant news, etc.
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A person or thing that comes before to announce, or give an indication of, what follows; forerunner; harbinger.
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To introduce, announce, foretell, etc.
verb
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To herald is defined as to say or show that something is coming, or to announce the news.

An example of to herald is how the circus announcer tells the audience the name of the upcoming act in the circus.

An example of to herald is to write the news for a local community in a newspaper.

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The definition of a herald is a messenger or announcer.

An example of a herald is a town news crier.

An example of a herald is the very first flower to bloom in the spring.

noun
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A messenger, especially one bringing important news.

The herald blew his trumpet and shouted that the King was dead.

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A harbinger, giving signs of things to come.

Daffodils are heralds of Spring.

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(heraldry) An official whose speciality is heraldry, especially one between the ranks of pursuivant and king of arms.

Rouge Dragon is a herald at the College of Arms.

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(entomology) A moth (Scoliopteryx libatrix)
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To proclaim, announce, etc. an event.

Daffodils herald the Spring.

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A person who carries or proclaims important news; a messenger.
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To proclaim, especially with enthusiasm; announce or acclaim.

Cheers that heralded the team's arrival.

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In England, an official in charge of genealogies, coats of arms, etc.
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To publicize.
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To be a sign of; foreshadow.

The discovery heralds a new era in drug treatment.

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Origin of herald

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman of Germanic origin koro- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman heraud, from Old French heraut, hiraut (French: héraut).

    From Wiktionary