Puncheon meaning

pŭnchən
The amount of liquid contained in a puncheon.
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A short wooden upright used in structural framing.
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A heavy, broad piece of roughly dressed timber with one side hewed flat.
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A short, upright wooden post used in a framework.
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A punching, perforating, or stamping tool, especially one used by a goldsmith.
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A cask with a capacity of from 72 to 120 gallons (273 to 454 liters).
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Any of various devices for punching, perforating, or stamping; esp., a figured die used by goldsmiths, etc.
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A large cask of varying capacity (72-120 gal), for beer, wine, etc.
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As much as such a cask will hold.
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A figured stamp, die, or punch, used by goldsmiths, cutlers, etc.
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A short, upright piece of timber in framing; a short post; an intermediate stud.
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A split log or heavy slab of timber with the face smoothed, used for flooring or construction.
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A cask used to hold liquids, having a capacity varying from 72 to 120 gallons; a tercian.
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Origin of puncheon

  • Middle English punchon from Old French ponçon, ponchon from Vulgar Latin pūnctiō pūnctiōn- punch from pūnctiāre to pierce from Latin pūnctus past participle of pungere to prick peuk- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English ponchon from Old French poinçon, poinchon punch, cask (probably because the casks were inspected and marked with a punch) puncheon1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman ponchon, pounceon et al., and Middle French ponçon, poinchon et al., from Latin punctio (“action of piercing").

    From Wiktionary