Kick-off meaning

(intransitive) To make the first kick in a game or part of a game.

The players kick off for the third quarter and the clock starts.

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(US, idiomatic, ranching, slang) To force the weaning of a bovine cow's calf by restricting the calf's access to its mother's udders. Used figuratively or literally.

A week after we kicked off her calf that cow was still bawling.

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(UK, idiomatic, colloquial) To be overcome with anger, to start an argument or a fight.

When she called him a drunk, it was the last straw. He just kicked off.

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(soccer) The opening kick of each half of a game of football.
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(by extension) The opening sequence of any event.
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(idiomatic, intransitive) To start; to launch.

Let's kick off this project with a planning meeting.

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To dismiss; to expel; to remove from a position.

I got kicked off the team after a string of poor performances.

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(idiomatic, colloquial, euphemistic) To die or quit permanently.

It's a wonder that old dog hasn't kicked off yet.

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(idiomatic) To shut down or turn off suddenly.

The washer was working fine until it kicked off in the middle of a cycle.

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Origin of kick-off