Lattice meaning

lătĭs
Something, such as a decorative motif or heraldic bearing, that resembles an open, patterned framework.
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To construct or furnish with a lattice or latticework.
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An openwork structure of crossed strips or bars of wood, metal, etc. used as a screen, support, etc.
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Something resembling or suggesting such a structure.
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A door, gate, shutter, trellis, etc. formed of such a structure.
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To arrange like a lattice; make a lattice of.
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To furnish or cover with a lattice or latticework.
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A set of points that, when joined together, form the geometric shape of a mineral crystal. The lattice of the mineral halite, for example, is in the shape of a cube.
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A flat panel constructed with widely-spaced crossed thin strips of wood or other material, commonly used as a garden trellis.
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(heraldry) A bearing with vertical and horizontal bands.
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(crystallography) A regular spacing or arrangement of geometric points, often decorated with a motif.
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(order theory) A partially ordered set in which every pair of elements has a unique supremum and an infimum.
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(group theory) A discrete subgroup of Rn which spans the real vector space Rn.
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To make a lattice of.

To lattice timbers.

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To close, as an opening, with latticework; to furnish with a lattice.

To lattice a window.

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The definition of lattice is a structure made from wood or metal pieces arranged in a criss-cross or diamond pattern with spaces in between.

A metal fence that is made up of pieces of metal arranged in criss-cross patterns with open air in between the pieces of metal is an example of lattice.

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Origin of lattice

  • Middle English latis from Old French lattis from latte lath of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English latis, from Middle French lattis (“lathing"), from Old French lattis, from latte (“a lath"), from Frankish *latta (“a lath"), from Proto-Germanic *lattō(n), *laþþō(n), *laþēn (“lath, board"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lat- (“beam, log"). Cognate with Old High German latta (German Latte, “lath"), Old English lætt (“lath"), Middle Low German lāde (“plank, counter, sales counter"), German Laden (“shop"). More at lath.

    From Wiktionary