Conjecture definition

kən-jĕkchər
Opinion or judgment based on inconclusive or incomplete evidence; guesswork.
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An opinion or conclusion based on guesswork.

The commentators made various conjectures about the outcome of the next election.

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To judge or conclude by conjecture; guess.
verb
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To make a conjecture.
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To arrive at or propose by conjecture; guess.
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To make a conjecture.
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A conclusion or inference based upon incomplete or uncertain evidence. To make a conclusion or inference based upon such evidence.
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Conjecture means to make a guess at something.

An example of conjecture is a scientist coming up with a theory about something.

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The definition of a conjecture is a theory.

An example of conjecture is the belief that climate change will result in sea levels rising.

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An inferring, theorizing, or predicting from incomplete or uncertain evidence; guesswork.

An editorial full of conjecture.

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An inference, theory, or prediction based on guesswork; guess.
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(obs.) Occult divination.
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(formal) A statement or an idea which is unproven, but is thought to be true; a guess.

I explained it, but it is pure conjecture whether he understood, or not.

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(formal) A supposition based upon incomplete evidence; a hypothesis.

The physicist used his conjecture about subatomic particles to design an experiment.

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(mathematics, philology) A statement likely to be true based on available evidence, but which has not been formally proven.
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(formal, intransitive) To guess; to venture an unproven idea.

I do not know if it is true; I am simply conjecturing here.

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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
conjecture
Plural:
conjectures

Origin of conjecture

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin coniectūra from coniectus past participle of conicere to infer com- com- iacere to throw yē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French, from Latin coniectūra (“a guess”), from coniectus, perfect passive participle of cōniciō (“throw or cast together; guess”), from con- (“together”) + iaciō (“throw, hurl”); see jet. Compare adjective, eject, inject, project, reject, subject, object, trajectory.

    From Wiktionary