Inject meaning

ĭn-jĕkt
To force or drive (a fluid) into something.

Inject fuel into an engine cylinder; inject air into a liquid mixture.

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To place into an orbit or trajectory.

Inject a satellite into geosynchronous orbit.

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To introduce (a missing feature, quality, etc.)

To inject a note of humor into a story.

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To introduce into conversation or consideration.

Tried to inject a note of humor into the negotiations.

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To place into circulation.

Inject money into the economy.

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(physics) To cause (a beam of particles, for example) to strike a target.
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To force or drive (a fluid) into some passage, cavity, or chamber; esp., to introduce or force (a liquid) into some part of the body by means of a syringe, hypodermic needle, etc.
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To fill by, or subject to, injection.
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To interject (a remark, opinion, etc.) as into a discussion.
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To introduce a drug, vaccine, or other substance into a body part, especially by means of a syringe.
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To treat by means of injection.

Injected the patient with digitalis.

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To push or pump (something, especially fluids) into a cavity or passage.

The nurse injected a painkilling drug into the veins of my forearm.

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To introduce (something) suddenly or violently.

Punk injected a much-needed sense of urgency into the British music scene.

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To administer an injection to (someone or something), especially of medicine or drugs.

Now lie back while we inject you with the anesthetic.

To inject the blood vessels.

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(intransitive) To take or be administered something by means of injection, especially medicine or drugs.

It's been a week since I stopped injecting, and I'm still in withdrawal.

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(computing) To introduce (code) into an existing program or its memory space, often without tight integration and sometimes through a security vulnerability.
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Origin of inject

  • Latin inicere iniect- to throw in in- in in–2 iacere to throw yē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the participle stem of Latin iniciō (“I throw in”), from in- + iaciō (“I throw”).

    From Wiktionary