Inoculate meaning

ĭ-nŏk'yə-lāt'
To introduce ideas, etc. into the mind of; imbue.
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To put or implant microorganisms into (soil, a culture medium, etc.) to develop a culture, stimulate growth, fix nitrogen, etc.
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To introduce a serum, vaccine, or antigenic substance into the body of a person or animal, especially to produce or boost immunity to a specific disease.
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To communicate a disease to a living organism by transferring its causative agent into the organism.
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To implant microorganisms or infectious material into a culture medium.
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(immunology) To introduce an antigenic substance or vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease.
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(by extension) To safeguard or protect something as if by inoculation.
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To add one substance to another; to spike.

The culture medium was inoculated with selenium to investigate the rate of uptake.

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To graft by inserting buds.

To inoculate the bud of one tree or plant into another.

To inoculate a tree.

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(figuratively) To introduce into the mind (used especially of harmful ideas or principles); to imbue.

To inoculate someone with treason or infidelity.

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The definition of inoculate is to vaccinate someone against a disease.

When you get your dog a rabies shot, this is an example of a situation where you inoculate your dog against rabies.

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To introduce a serum, vaccine, or antigenic substance into (the body of a person or animal), especially to produce or boost immunity to a specific disease.
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To communicate a disease to (a living organism) by transferring its causative agent into the organism.
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To implant microorganisms or infectious material into (a culture medium).
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To safeguard as if by inoculation; protect.
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To introduce an idea or attitude into the mind of.
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Origin of inoculate

  • Middle English inoculaten to graft a scion from Latin inoculāre inoculāt- in- in in–2 oculus eye, bud okw- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English inoculate, from Latin inoculātus, perfect passive participle of inoculō (“ingraft an eye or bud of one plant into (another), implant”), from in (“in”) + oculus (“an eye”).
    From Wiktionary