Pump definitions

pŭmp
The definition of a pump is a device that forces gas or liquid into something, or pulls gas or liquid out of something.

An example of a pump is what you would use to fill an air mattress.

An example ofa pump is the machine used to milk a cow.

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A machine or device for raising, compressing, or transferring fluids.
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A molecular mechanism for the active transport of ions or molecules across a cell membrane.
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Electromagnetic radiation used to raise atoms or molecules to a higher energy level.
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The heart.
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The place where consumers purchase gasoline. Used with the .

Gas prices rising at the pump.

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To cause to flow by means of a pump or pumplike organ or device.

Derricks pumped oil out of the ground. The heart pumps blood throughout the body.

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To draw, deliver, or pour forth.

A writer who pumped out a new novel every year.

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To propel, eject, or insert.

Pumped new life into the economy.

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To cause to move with an up-and-down or back-and-forth motion.

A bicyclist pumping the pedals; a piston pumping a shaft.

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To push or pull (a brake or lever, for instance) rapidly.

A driver pumping the brakes.

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To shoot (bullets, for example) at or into.

A gunner pumping rounds at a target.

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To raise (atoms or molecules) to a higher energy level by exposing them to electromagnetic radiation at a resonant frequency.
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To transport (ions or molecules) against a concentration gradient by the expenditure of chemically stored energy.
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To invest (money) repeatedly or persistently in something.
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To question closely or persistently.

Pump a witness for secret information.

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To promote or publicize vigorously.

The company pumped its new product on its website.

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To operate a pump.
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To move gas or liquid with a pump or a pumplike organ or device.
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To move up and down or back and forth in a vigorous manner.

My legs were pumping as I ran up the stairs.

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To flow in spurts.

Blood was pumping from the wound.

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To fake a throw, pass, or shot by moving the arm or arms without releasing the ball.
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A woman's shoe that has medium or high heels and no fastenings.
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Any of various machines that force a liquid or gas into or through, or draw it out of, something, as by suction or pressure.
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The heart.
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To raise or move (fluids) with a pump.
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To remove water, etc. from, as with a pump.
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To drive air into with a pump or bellows.
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To force in, draw out, drive, move up and down, pour forth, etc. by means of a pump or as a pump does.
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To apply force to with a pumping, up-and-down motion.
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To transfer or inject energy into (particles, the electrons of a laser, etc.)
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To question closely and persistently.
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To get (information) from a person in this way.
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To work a pump.
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To raise or move water, etc. with a pump.
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To move up and down or go by moving up and down like a pump handle or piston.
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To flow in, out, or through by, or as if by, being pumped.
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To fake a shot or a throw.
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A low-cut shoe without straps or ties; esp., such a woman's shoe with a moderate to high heel.
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A machine or device for raising, compressing, or transferring fluids.
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A molecular mechanism for the active transport of ions or molecules across a cell membrane.
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To cause to flow by means of a pump or pumplike organ or device.

Derricks pumped oil out of the ground. The heart pumps blood throughout the body.

verb
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To flow in spurts.

Blood was pumping from the wound.

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To cause to move with an up-and-down or back-and-forth motion.

A bicyclist pumping the pedals; a piston pumping a shaft.

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To transport ions or molecules against a concentration gradient by the expenditure of chemically stored energy.
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A device used to raise or transfer fluids. Most pumps function either by compression or suction.
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A molecular mechanism for the active transport of ions or molecules across a cell membrane.
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A device for moving or compressing a liquid or gas.

This pump can deliver 100 gallons of water per minute.

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An instance of the action of a pump; one stroke of a pump; any action similar to pumping.

It takes thirty pumps to get 10 litres; he did 50 pumps of the weights.

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A device for dispensing liquid or gas to be sold, particularly fuel.

This pump is out of order, but you can gas up at the next one.

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(bodybuilding) A swelling of the muscles caused by increased blood flow following high intensity weightlifting.
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(colloquial) A ride on a bicycle given to a passenger, usually on the handlebars or fender.

She gave the other girl a pump on her new bike.

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To use a pump to move (liquid or gas).

I've pumped over 1000 gallons of water in the last ten minutes.

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(often followed by up) To fill with air.

He pumped up the air-bed by hand, but used the service station air to pump up the tyres.

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To move rhythmically, as the motion of a pump.

I pumped my fist with joy when I won the race.

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To shake (a person's hand) vigorously.
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To gain information from (a person) by persistent questioning.
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(intransitive) To use a pump to move liquid or gas.

I've been pumping for over a minute but the water isn't coming through.

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(intransitive, slang) To be going very well.

The waves were really pumping this morning.

Last night's party was really pumping.

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(sports) To kick, throw or hit the ball far and high.
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(Scotland, slang) To pass gas; to fart.
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(computing) To pass (messages) into a program so that it can obey them.
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(UK) A type of shoe, a trainer or sneaker.
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(chiefly North America) A type of very high-heeled shoe; stilettoes.

She was wearing a lovely new pair of pumps.

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A dancing shoe.
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A type of shoe without a heel (source: Dictionarium Britannicum - 1736)
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Origin of pump

The etymology of the term is unclear and disputed. One possibility is that it comes from "Pomp" (i.e. ornamentation), claimed in Skeat & Skeat's A Concise Etymological Dictionary of the English Language (ISBN 9781596050921), and another is that it refers to the sound made by the foot moving inside the shoe when dancing, suggested as a probable source in Chambers's etymological dictionary (James Donald - Published by W. and R. Chambers, 1867). The Oxford English Dictionary claims that it appeared in the 16th century, and lists its origin as "obscure". It has also been linked to the Dutch pampoesje, possibly borrowed from Javanese "pampus", ultimately from Persian (papush) / Arabic (babush) (International archives of ethnography: Volume 9 - Intern. Gesellschaft für Ethnographie; Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsch Indië - Ter Lands-drukkerij, 1870).