Theorem meaning

thēər-əm, thîrəm
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An idea that has been demonstrated as true or is assumed to be so demonstrable.
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An expression of relations in an equation or formula.
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(math., physics) A proposition embodying something to be proved.
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The definition of a theorem is an idea that can be proven or shown as true.

An example of a theorem is the idea that mixing yellow and red make orange.

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A mathematical statement whose truth can be proved on the basis of a given set of axioms or assumptions.
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(mathematics) A mathematical statement of some importance that has been proven to be true. Minor theorems are often called propositions. Theorems which are not very interesting in themselves but are an essential part of a bigger theorem's proof are called lemmas.
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(mathematics, colloquial, nonstandard) A mathematical statement that is expected to be true; as, Fermat's Last Theorem (as which it was known long before it was proved in the 1990s.)
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(logic) A syntactically correct expression that is deducible from the given axioms of a deductive system.
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To formulate into a theorem.
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(mathematics) A proposition that has been or is to be proved on the basis of explicit assumptions.
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A proposition that is not self-evident but that can be proved from accepted premises.
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Origin of theorem

  • Late Latin theōrēma from Greek from theōrein to look at from theōros spectator theory

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Via Late Latin theōrÄ“ma, from Ancient Greek θεώρημα (theōrÄ“ma, “speculation, proposition to be proved") (Euclid), from θεωρέω (theōreō, “I look at, view, consider, examine"), from θεωρός (theōros, “spectator"), from θέα (thea, “a view") + ὁράω (oraō, “I see, look"). See also theory, and theater.

    From Wiktionary