Dictum meaning

dĭktəm
An authoritative, often formal pronouncement.
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A statement or saying, esp. a formal statement.
  • Of fact, opinion, principle, etc.
  • Of one's will or judgment.
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Dictum is defined as a statement or ruling that is from an official source or that expresses a principle.

An example of dictum is a rule found in the Constitution or a ruling issued by a judge.

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(law) A side remark made in a judicial opinion that is not necessary for the decision in the case and therefore is not to be regarded as establishing the law of the case or setting legal precedent.
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(law) A judge's remark or observation on some point of law which is not essential to the case in question, hence not binding as a legal precedent.
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In a court’s decision, a statement of opinion or of a general rule that is explanatory or suggestive only, and not binding on courts in future cases, because it does not form part of the court’s central argument. For example, a judge’s suggestion as to how she might decide a related controversy not presently before her would be considered dictum.
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An authoritative statement; a dogmatic saying; a maxim, an apothegm.
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A judicial opinion expressed by judges on points that do not necessarily arise in the case, and are not involved in it.
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The report of a judgment made by one of the judges who has given it.
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An arbitrament or award.
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Origin of dictum

  • Latin from neuter past participle of dīcere to say deik- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin dictum (“proverb, maxim”).

    From Wiktionary