Beacon definition

bēkən
Frequency:
A person or thing that warns, offers encouragement or guidance, etc.
noun
26
5
To light up (darkness, etc.)
verb
11
5
To shine or serve as a beacon.
verb
5
0
(1) See beaconing and Web bug.
6
2
A lighthouse.
noun
4
1
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To provide or mark with beacons.
verb
4
3
To provide with or signal as a beacon.
verb
2
1
A source of guidance or inspiration.

A beacon of hope.

noun
1
0
Any light or radio signal for warning or guiding.
noun
1
1
A radio transmitter that sends out signals for the guidance of aircraft, as at night or in fog.
noun
1
1
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The definition of a beacon is a person or thing that warns, guides or offers support.

A lighthouse is an example of a beacon.

The lights of a runway are an example of a beacon for a landing plane.

A friend who offers direction and guidance is an example of a beacon for someone in need.

noun
0
0
A signal fire, especially one used to warn of an enemy's approach.
noun
0
0
A radio transmitter that emits a characteristic guidance signal for aircraft.
noun
0
0
A signaling device that emits a repeating sound; a pinger.
noun
0
0
A signal fire to notify of the approach of an enemy, or to give any notice, commonly of warning.
noun
0
0
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(nautical) A signal or conspicuous mark erected on an eminence near the shore, or moored in shoal water, as a guide to mariners.

noun
0
0
A high hill or other easily distinguishable object near the shore which can serve as guidance for seafarers.
noun
0
0
That which gives notice of danger.
noun
0
0
To act as a beacon.
verb
0
0
To give light to, as a beacon; to light up; to illumine.
verb
0
0
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To furnish with a beacon or beacons.
verb
0
0
A signal fire, esp. one on a hill, pole, etc.
noun
1
2
A signaling or guiding device that emits light, such as a lighthouse.
noun
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
beacon
Plural:
beacons

Origin of beacon

  • Middle English beken from Old English bēacen bhā-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English beken, from Old English bēacen (“sign, signal”), from Proto-Germanic *baukną (cf. West Frisian beaken (“buoy”), Dutch baken (“beacon”), Middle High German bouchen (“sign”)), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂u-, *bʰeh₂- (“to shine”). More at fantasy.

    From Wiktionary