Fantasy meaning

făntə-sē, -zē
The creative imagination; unrestrained fancy.
noun
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3
To imagine; visualize.
verb
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1
That which comes from one's imagination.
noun
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1
Fantasy is defined as a product of the imagination, particularly one that is defined as extravagant.

An example of fantasy is a daydream to be the owner of a chain of restaurants one day.

noun
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4
An unnatural or bizarre mental image; illusion; phantasm.
noun
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3
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(literature) The literary genre generally dealing with themes of magic and fictive medieval technology.
noun
3
1
Imagination or fancy; esp., wild, visionary fancy.
noun
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0
Of or pertaining to any of various games in which scoring is keyed statistically to the performances of actual players in a particular sport.
adjective
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An imagined event or sequence of mental images, such as a daydream, usually fulfilling a wish or psychological need.
noun
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noun
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(slang) The drug gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.
noun
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(literary) To fantasize (about)
verb
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Something, such as an invention, that is a creation of the fancy.
noun
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1
A capricious or fantastic idea; a conceit.
noun
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1
(obsolete) A hallucination.
noun
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1
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An imagined event or sequence of mental images, such as a daydream, usually fulfilling a wish or psychological need.
noun
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1
An unrealistic or improbable supposition.
noun
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1
A coin issued especially by a questionable authority and not intended for use as currency.
noun
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1
Relating to or being a game in which participants act as owners of imaginary sports teams whose personnel consists of actual players selected from a professional sports league and team performance is determined by the combined statistics of the players.
adjective
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1
An odd notion; whim; caprice.
noun
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1
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noun
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To form fantasies about.
verb
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1
To indulge in fantasies, as by daydreaming.
verb
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1
Of or like a fantasy.
adjective
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1

Origin of fantasy

  • Middle English fantasie, fantsy from Old French fantasie from Latin phantasia from Greek phantasiā appearance, imagination from phantazesthai to appear from phantos visible from phainesthai phan- to appear passive of phainein to show bhā-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French fantasie (“fantasy”), from Latin phantasia (“imagination”), from Ancient Greek φαντασία (phantasia, “apparition”), from φαντάζω (phantazō, “to show at the eye or the mind”), from φαίνω (phainō, “to show in light”), from the same root as ϕῶς (phôs, “light”).

    From Wiktionary