Illusion meaning

ĭ-lo͝o'zhən
Illusion is defined as something that tricks the eye.

An example of an illusion is a drawing that can look like an old lady or a vase depending on which part you focus on.

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The definition of an illusion is an idea or something you can see that isn’t real.

An example of an illusion is a magician making someone disappear in a box.

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A false idea or conception; belief or opinion not in accord with the facts.
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The condition of being deceived by a false perception or belief.

Spent months flailing about in illusion.

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A fine transparent net fabric, used for dresses or trimmings.
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A delicate, gauzy silk tulle used for veils, etc.
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(countable) Anything that seems to be something that it is not.

We saw what looked like a tiger among the trees, but it was an illusion caused by the shadows of the branches.

Using artificial additives, scientists can create the illusion of fruit flavours in food.

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(countable) A misapprehension; a belief in something that is in fact not true.

Jane has this illusion that John is in love with her.

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(countable) A magician’s trick.
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(uncountable) The state of being deceived or misled.
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Something that is erroneously perceived or construed.

The animal in the shadows turned out to be an illusion.

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Origin of illusion

  • Middle English illusioun from Old French from Late Latin illūsiō illūsiōn- from Latin a mocking, irony from illūsus past participle of illūdere to mock in- against in–2 lūdere to play leid- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French illusion, from Latin illūsiō, from illūdere, from in- (“at, upon”), + lūdere (“to play, mock, trick”)
    From Wiktionary