Gothic definition

gŏthĭk
Of or having to do with a type of fiction orig. and esp. of the late 18th and early 19th cent. using remote (and, orig., medieval) settings and a sinister, eerie atmosphere to suggest horror and mystery.
adjective
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Gothic is defined as an East Germanic language, or an architecture style of the 12th through 16th centuries.

An example of gothic is the Reims Cathedral in France.

noun
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Designating or of a type of romance set typically in the 18th or 19th cent. and relating the melodramatic adventures of the heroine.
adjective
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An extinct Germanic language, once spoken by the Goths.
pronoun
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Of or relating to the Goths.
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Barbarous, rude, unpolished, belonging to the "Dark Ages", medieval as opposed to classical.

"Enormities which gleam like comets through the darkness of gothic and superstitious ages." (Percy Bysshe Shelley in a 1812 letter, Prose Works (1888) II.384, cited after OED)

adjective
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Of or relating to the architectural style favored in western Europe in the 12th to 16th centuries.
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(typography) In England, of the name of type formerly used to print German, also known as black letter.
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(typography) In the USA, of a sans serif typeface using straight, even-width lines, also called grotesque.
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Of or relating to the goth subculture or lifestyle.

Why is this gothic glam so popular? (New Musical Express 24 December 1983, cited after OED)

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Designating, of, or related to a style of architecture developed in W Europe between the 12th and 16th cent. and characterized by the use of ribbed vaulting, flying buttresses, pointed arches, steep, high roofs, etc.
adjective
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The East Germanic language of the Goths.
noun
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Gothic style, esp. in architecture.
noun
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Of or relating to a style of fiction that emphasizes the grotesque, mysterious, and desolate.
adjective
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Barbarous; crude.
adjective
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Of or relating to the Goths or their language.
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Germanic; Teutonic.
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Of or relating to an architectural style prevalent in western Europe from the 12th through the 15th century and characterized by pointed arches, rib vaulting, and a developing emphasis on verticality and the impression of height.
adjective
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Of or relating to an architectural style derived from medieval Gothic.
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Medieval.
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Not classical.
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Barbarous; uncivilized.
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A style of sans-serif type.
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A heavy, ornate style of type, now used especially in calligraphy.
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Alternative capitalization of Gothic.
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Of or relating to painting, sculpture, or other art forms prevalent in northern Europe from the 12th through the 15th century.
adjective
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The extinct East Germanic language of the Goths.
noun
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Gothic art or architecture.
noun
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Of the Goths or their language or culture.
adjective
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The definition of gothic is related to medieval style or the horror and mystery depicted in fiction about the 18th and 19th centuries.

An example of a gothic structure is the Reims Cathedral in France.

An example of gothic style is dark makeup, dark clothes and hair dyed black.

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Of or relating to the style of fictional writing associated with the Gothic revival, emphasizing violent or macabre events in a mysterious, desolate setting.
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A novel written in the Gothic style.
noun
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Of or relating to the Middle Ages; medieval.
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A novel in a style emphasizing the grotesque, mysterious, and desolate.
noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
gothic
Plural:
gothics

Origin of gothic

  • The various usages of the adjective are introduced nearly simultaneously in the first half of the 17th century. The literal meaning "of the Goths" is found in the 1611 preface of the King James Bible, in reference to the Gothicke tongue. The generalized meaning of "Germanic, Teutonic" appears in the 1640s. Reference to the medieval period in Western Europe, and specifically the architecture of that period, also appears in the 1640s, as does reference to "Gothic characters" or "Gothic letters" in typography.

    From Wiktionary

  • Goth +‎ -ic, English from the 17th century, ad Latin gothicus.

    From Wiktionary