Gothic Definition

gŏthĭk
adjective
Of the Goths or their language or culture.
Webster's New World
Germanic; Teutonic.
American Heritage
Designating, of, or related to a style of architecture developed in W Europe between the 12th and 16th cent. and characterized by the use of ribbed vaulting, flying buttresses, pointed arches, steep, high roofs, etc.
Webster's New World
Of or relating to the Middle Ages; medieval.
American Heritage
Medieval.
Webster's New World
Synonyms:
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noun
The East Germanic language of the Goths.
Webster's New World
Gothic style, esp. in architecture.
Webster's New World
A novel in a style emphasizing the grotesque, mysterious, and desolate.
American Heritage
A style of sans-serif type.
Webster's New World
A heavy, ornate style of type, now used especially in calligraphy.
Webster's New World
Synonyms:
black-letterGothic architecture
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pronoun

An extinct Germanic language, once spoken by the Goths.

Wiktionary

Other Word Forms of Gothic

Noun

Singular:
gothic
Plural:
gothics

Origin of Gothic

  • The various usages of the adjective are introduced nearly simultaneously in the first half of the 17th century. The literal meaning "of the Goths" is found in the 1611 preface of the King James Bible, in reference to the Gothicke tongue. The generalized meaning of "Germanic, Teutonic" appears in the 1640s. Reference to the medieval period in Western Europe, and specifically the architecture of that period, also appears in the 1640s, as does reference to "Gothic characters" or "Gothic letters" in typography.

    From Wiktionary

  • Goth +‎ -ic, English from the 17th century, ad Latin gothicus.

    From Wiktionary

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