Baggage meaning

băgĭj
The definition of baggage is an abstract thing or idea which weighs upon a person, and ends up obstructing or inhibiting him.

An example of baggage is the fear a woman who has been cheated on in past relationships carries with her as she starts seeing someone new.

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Emotions or thoughts that stem from painful or unpleasant past experiences and that affect one's outlook or behavior.
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(uncountable, informal) Factors, especially psychological ones, which interfere with a person's ability to function effectively..

He's got a lot of emotional baggage.

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Baggage is defined as the suitcases, backpacks, or other various containers a person uses when traveling.

An example of baggage are the suitcases packed with personal items you take with you on vacation.

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The trunks, bags, parcels, and suitcases in which one carries one's belongings while traveling; luggage.
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The movable equipment and supplies of an army.
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The trunks, bags, etc. of a traveler, esp. when packed and being used on a trip; luggage.
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The supplies and gear of an army.
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(usually uncountable) Luggage; traveling equipment.

Please put your baggage in the trunk.

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1897, Charles Whibley, A Book of Scoundrels.

But he had a roving eye and a joyous temperament; and though he loved me better than any of the baggages to whom he paid court, he would not visit me so often as he should.

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1910, Gertrude Hall, Chantecler.

But your perverse attempts to wring blushes from little baggages in convenient corners outrage my love of Love!

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(military, countable and uncountable) An army's portable equipment; its baggage train.
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Origin of baggage

  • Middle English bagage from Old French bague bundle perhaps of Germanic origin Old Norse baggi bag, bundle Sense 4, perhaps from French bagasse from Provençal bagassa ultimately from Arabic baġī prostitute from baġā to fornicate bġy in Semitic roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English bagage, from Old French bagage, from bague (“bundle”), from Germanic (compare bag).

    From Wiktionary