Purse meaning

pûrs
A usually closable small bag or pouch for carrying money.
noun
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A sum of money collected as a present or offered as a prize.
noun
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Purse is defined as to gather into small folds, or to pucker the lips tightly together.

An example of purse is to gather a piece of fabric.

An example of purse is to pucker your lips around a drinking straw.

verb
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The definition of a purse is a small bag or pouch to carry money, or a sum of prize money.

An example of a purse is a wristlet.

An example of a purse is the amount of money that can be won at a horse race.

noun
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A usually closable bag used for carrying keys, a wallet, and other personal items, especially by women; a handbag.
noun
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A small bag or pouch for carrying money.
noun
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(US) A handbag (small bag usually used by women for carrying various small personal items)
noun
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A small bag for carrying money.
noun
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A quantity of money given for a particular purpose.
noun
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(historical) A specific sum of money in certain countries: formerly 500 piastres in Turkey or 50 tomans in Persia.
noun
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To press (one's lips) in and together so that they protrude.
verb
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To draw up or contract into folds or wrinkles; to pucker; to knit.
verb
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To put into a purse.
verb
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Something that resembles a bag or pouch, such as a purse seine.
noun
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An available amount of money or resources.

A project funded by the public purse.

noun
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To gather or contract (the lips or brow) into wrinkles or folds; pucker.
verb
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Financial resources; money.
noun
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A sum of money collected as a present or given as a prize.
noun
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A woman's handbag.
noun
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Anything like a purse in shape, use, etc.
noun
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(archaic) To put in a purse.
verb
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Origin of purse

  • Middle English from Old English from Late Latin bursa bursa

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English pusa comes from Proto-Germanic *pusô (“bag, sack, scrip"), from Proto-Indo-European *bÅ«s- (“to swell, stuff"), and is cognate with Old High German pfoso (“pouch, purse"), Low German pÅ«se (“purse, bag"), Old Norse posi (“purse, bag"), Danish pose (“purse, bag"). Old English burse comes from Medieval Latin bursa (“leather bag") (compare English bursar), from Ancient Greek βύρσα (bursa, “hide, wine-skin").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English purs (“purse"), partly from Old English pusa (“wallet, bag, scrip"), and partly from Old English burse (“pouch, bag").

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare also Old French borse (French: bourse), Old Saxon bursa (“bag"), Old High German burissa (“wallet").

    From Wiktionary