Nasty meaning

năs'tē
An offensive, objectionable, or very unpleasant person or thing.
noun
9
3
Very dangerous, troublesome, grievous, etc.

A nasty bruise, a nasty curveball.

adjective
6
2
Painful or dangerous; grave.

A nasty accident.

adjective
4
5
One that is nasty.
noun
2
0
Nastic response or change.

Epinasty.

suffix
1
0
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Morally offensive or indecent.

A nasty film.

adjective
1
1
Exasperatingly difficult to solve or handle.

A nasty puzzle; a nasty problem.

adjective
1
1
Very dirty, filthy.
adjective
0
0
Offensive in taste or smell; nauseating.
adjective
0
0
Morally offensive; indecent.
adjective
0
0
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Contemptible, unpleasant (of a person). [from 15th c.]
adjective
0
0
Objectionable, unpleasant (of a thing); repellant, offensive. [from 16th c.]
adjective
0
0
Indecent or offensive; obscene, lewd. [from 17th c.]
adjective
0
0
Spiteful, unkind. [from 19th c.]
adjective
0
0
(chiefly UK) Awkward, difficult to navigate; dangerous. [from 19th c.]
adjective
0
0
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(chiefly UK) Grave or dangerous (of an accident, illness etc.). [from 19th c.]
adjective
0
0
(slang, chiefly US) Formidable, terrific; wicked. [from 20th c.]
adjective
0
0
(informal) Something nasty.

Processed foods are full of aspartame and other nasties.

This video game involves flying through a maze zapping various nasties.

noun
0
0
(euphemistic, preceded by "the") Sexual intercourse.
noun
0
0
Very unpleasant; objectionable.

Nasty weather.

adjective
0
1
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(now chiefly US) Dirty, filthy. [from 14th c.]
adjective
0
1
The definition of nasty is something that is very dirty, unpleasant or offensive.

An example of something nasty is the bottom of a dumpster.

An example of something nasty is a person using bad words.

adjective
0
2
Mean; malicious; ill-humored.

A nasty temper.

adjective
0
2
A condition of plant growth by a (specified) means or in a (specified) direction.

Epinasty.

affix
0
2

Origin of nasty

  • < Gr nastos (see nastic) + -y
    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition
  • Middle English nasti filthy possibly alteration of Old French nastre bad short for villenastre vilein bad villain -astre pejorative suff. (from Latin -aster)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Greek nastos pressed down nastic –y
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Origin unknown.
    From Wiktionary