Column definition

kŏləm
Frequency:
Something resembling an architectural column in form or function.

A column of mercury in a thermometer.

noun
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The definition of a column is a vertical arrangement of something, a regular article in a paper, magazine or website, or a structure that holds something up.

An example of column is an Excel list of budget items.

An example of column is a weekly recipe article.

An example of column is a pillar in the front of a building.

noun
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A vertical line of entries in a table, usually read from top to bottom.
noun
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A feature article that appears regularly in a publication, such as a newspaper.
noun
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A body of troops or army vehicles, usually strung out along a road.
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An arrangement of numbers in a single vertical line.
noun
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(anatomy) Any of various tubular or pillarlike supporting structures in the body, each generally having a single tissue origin and function.

The vertebral column.

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A vertical structure usually consisting of a base, a cylindrical shaft, and a capital, used as a support or standing alone as a monument.
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Any slender vertical support, as of steel or reinforced concrete.
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One of two or more vertical sections of text lying side by side in a document and separated by a rule or a blank space.
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In a , any of the parallel series of cells running up and down.
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Any of a series of feature articles appearing regularly in a newspaper or magazine, by a particular writer or about a certain subject.
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Such a series.
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A solid upright structure designed usually to support a larger structure above it, such as a roof or horizontal beam, but sometimes for decoration.
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A body of text meant to be read line by line, especially in printed material that has multiple adjacent such on a single page.

It was too hard to read the text across the whole page, so I split it into two columns.

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A unit of width, especially of advertisements, in a periodical, equivalent to the width of a usual column of text.

Each column inch costs $300 a week; this ad is four columns by three inches, so will run $3600 a week.

noun
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(by extension) A recurring feature in a periodical, especially an opinion piece, especially by a single author or small rotating group of authors, or on a single theme.

His initial foray into print media was as the author of a weekly column in his elementary-school newspaper.

noun
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Something having similar vertical form or structure to the things mentioned above, such as a spinal column.
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(botany) The gynostemium.
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(anatomy) Any of various tubular or pillarlike supporting structures in the body, each generally having a single tissue origin and function.

The vertebral column.

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(botany) A columnlike structure, especially one formed by the union of a stamen and the style in an orchid flower, or one formed by the united staminal filaments in flowers such as those of the hibiscus or mallow.
noun
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Any of the vertical sections of words or data that are displayed side by side, as on a newspaper page, separated by a rule or blank space.
noun
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A slender upright structure, generally consisting of a cylindrical shaft, a base, and a capital; pillar: it is usually a supporting or ornamental member in a building.
noun
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Anything like a column in shape or function.

A column of smoke, the spinal column.

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A formation of troops, ships, etc. in a file or adjacent files.
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A formation, as of troops or vehicles, in which all elements follow one behind the other.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
column
Plural:
columns

Origin of column

  • Middle English columne from Latin columna kel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French columne, from Latin columna (“a column, pillar, post”), originally a collateral form of columen, contraction culmen (“a pillar, top, crown, summit”), o-grade form from a Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (“going around”). Akin to Latin collis (“a hill”), celsus (“high”), probably to Ancient Greek κολοφών (kolophōn, “top, summit”).

    From Wiktionary