Arm meaning

ärm
Arms are weapons.

An example of arms that are weapons are guns, knives, and swords.

noun
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To equip with weapons.

Armed themselves with loaded pistols; arm a missile with a warhead; arm a nation for war.

verb
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A part similar to a human arm, such as the forelimb of an animal or a long part projecting from a central support in a machine.
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An upper limb of the human body, connecting the hand and wrist to the shoulder.
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An administrative or functional branch, as of an organization.
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Power or authority.

The long arm of the law.

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(sports) The skill of throwing or pitching a ball well.
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A branch of a military force.

Infantry, armor, and other combat arms.

noun
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To supply or equip oneself with weaponry.
verb
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To prepare oneself for warfare or conflict.
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To provide with something that strengthens or protects.

A space reentry vehicle that was armed with a ceramic shield.

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To prepare (a weapon or electronic system, such as an alarm) for use or operation, as by releasing a safety device.
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Adjustable-rate mortgage.
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Armenia.
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Anything resembling this in structure or function.
  • The forelimb of some vertebrate animals.
  • Any limb of an invertebrate animal.
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Anything commonly in contact with the human arm.
  • A sleeve of a garment.
  • A support for the arm on a chair, sofa, etc.
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Anything thought of as armlike, esp. in being attached or connected to something larger.

An arm of the sea, a yardarm, the arm of a balance, an arm of the government, etc.

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Power to seize, control, etc.

The long arm of the law.

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(slang, baseball) A pitcher.

A team with several young arms.

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Any instrument used in fighting; weapon.
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Warfare; fighting.
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Any combatant branch of the military forces.
noun
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To provide with weapons, tools, etc.
verb
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To provide with something that protects or fortifies.
verb
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To prepare to attack or to meet attack.

Reporters armed with questions.

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To make ready or equip with parts needed for operation.

To arm a missile with a warhead.

verb
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To equip oneself with weapons, as in preparing for war.
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To prepare for any struggle.
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Adjustable-rate mortgage.
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An upper limb of the human body, connecting the hand and wrist to the shoulder.
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A part similar to a human arm, such as the forelimb of an animal or a long part projecting from a central support in a machine.
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The most widely used microprocessors worldwide. Designed by ARM Holdings plc, Cambridge, England (www.arm.com), the company was founded in 1990 by Acorn Computers, Apple and VLSI Technology. In 2016, ARM was acquired by Japan-based Softbank. The ARM brand originally stood for Acorn RISC Machine and later Advanced RISC Machine.ARM chips are 32-bit and 64-bit RISC-based CPUs that are known for their low cost and low power requirements (see RISC). Manufactured under license from ARM by more than a dozen semiconductor companies, billions of ARM-based devices are made every year, including smartphones, tablets, game consoles, e-book readers, netbooks, TVs and myriad other consumer and industrial products.Very often, an ARM CPU is the processor in a system-on-chip (see SoC). For example, Qualcomm's Snapdragon and NVIDIA's Tegra are ARM-based smartphone and tablet SoCs.Cortex, SecurCore and StrongARMARM processor families are designated by the prefix "ARM" and a digit, such as ARM7, ARM9 and ARM11 or with names such as Cortex and SecurCore, the latter used for secure identification products such as smart cards.The StrongARM was a high-speed version of the ARM chip that was jointly developed with Digital Equipment Corporation. The SA-100, the first StrongARM chip, was delivered in 1995, and Intel acquired the technology from Digital in 1997. See StrongARM, Thumb and big.LITTLE.
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The portion of the upper human appendage, from the shoulder to the wrist and sometimes including the hand.

She stood with her right arm extended and her palm forward to indicate “Stop!”

noun
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(anatomy) The extended portion of the upper limb, from the shoulder to the elbow.

The arm and forearm are parts of the upper limb in the human body.

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A limb, or locomotive or prehensile organ, of an invertebrate animal.

The arms of an octopus.

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A long, narrow, more or less rigid part of an object extending from the main part or centre of the object, such as the arm of an armchair, a crane, a pair of spectacles or a pair of compasses.

The robot arm reached out and placed the part on the assembly line.

noun
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A bay or inlet off a main body of water.

Shelburne Bay is an arm of Lake Champlain.

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The cavalry arm of the military service.

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(figuratively) Power; might; strength; support.

The arm of the law.

The secular arm.

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Two N. Kins.

Arm your prize; / I know you will not lose him.

verb
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(UK dialectal, chiefly Scotland) Poor; lacking in riches or wealth.
adjective
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(UK dialectal, chiefly Scotland) To be pitied; pitiful; wretched.
adjective
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(usually used in the plural) A weapon.
noun
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(in the plural) Heraldic bearings or insignia.
noun
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To supply with armour or (later especially) weapons.
verb
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To prepare a tool or a weapon for action; to activate.

Remember to arm an alarm system.

verb
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To cover or furnish with a plate, or with whatever will add strength, force, security, or efficiency.

To arm the hit of a sword; to arm a hook in angling.

verb
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(figuratively) To furnish with means of defence; to prepare for resistance; to fortify, in a moral sense.
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Mar, Mar, Mar., MAR.
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The definition of an arm is a limb that extends from the shoulder of the body.

An example of an arm is the part of your body from which your wrist extends.

noun
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Arm is defined as a part, or extension of, a political body or organization.

Another example of an arm is the legislative branch of the U.S. government.

noun
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Something, such as a sleeve on a garment or a support on a chair, that is designed to cover or support the human arm.
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A relatively narrow extension jutting out from a large mass.

An arm of the sea.

noun
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A weapon, especially a firearm.

Troops bearing arms; ICBMs, bombs, and other nuclear arms.

noun
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To equip with what is needed for effective action.

Tax advisers who were armed with the latest forms.

verb
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Armenian.
abbreviation
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(baseball, football) The ability to pitch or throw a ball.
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(slang) an arm and a leg
  • An excessively high price:
    A cruise that cost an arm and a leg.
idiom
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arm in arm
  • With arms linked together:
    They walked across the beach arm in arm.
idiom
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at arm's length
  • At such a distance that physical or social contact is discouraged:
    Kept the newcomer at arm's length at first.
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with open arms
  • With great cordiality and hospitality.
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up in arms
  • Extremely upset; indignant.
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an arm and a leg
  • a very great amount of money
    It cost me an arm and a leg.
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arm in arm
  • with arms interlocked, as two persons walking together
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at arm's length
  • at an emotional or relational distance so as to avoid or prevent intimacy, the appearance of favoritism, etc.
idiom
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(slang) put the arm on
  • to arrest or restrain
  • to request a loan or donation from
idiom
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under one's arm
  • between one's arm and side; specif., at the armpit
    Carrying a box under his arm.
idiom
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with open arms
  • in a warm and friendly way
idiom
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bear arms
  • to carry or be equipped with weapons
  • to serve as a combatant in the armed forces
idiom
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take up arms
  • to go to war or rise in rebellion
  • to enter a dispute
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to arms!
  • get ready to fight!
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under arms
  • equipped with weapons; ready for war
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up in arms
  • prepared to fight
  • indignant
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Origin of arm

  • From Middle English armes weapons from Old French pl. of arme weapon from Latin arma weapons ar- in Indo-European roots Verb, Middle English armen from Old French armer from Latin armāre from arma

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English earm ar- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English arm (“poor, wretched”), from Old English earm (“poor, miserable, pitiful, wretched”), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (“poor”), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (“poor, ill”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English, from Old French arme, from Latin arma (“weapons”), from Proto-Indo-European *ar-mo-, a suffixed form of *ar- (“to fit together”), hence ultimately cognate with etymology 1.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English earm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (“arm”), from Proto-Indo-European *arəm- (“arm”), a suffixed form of *ar- (“to fit together”).

    From Wiktionary