Brook definition

bro͝ok
A small stream, usually not so large as a river.
noun
26
5
To put up with; tolerate.

We will brook no further argument.

verb
17
4
To bear; endure; support; put up with; tolerate (usually used in the negative, with an abstract noun as object).

I will not brook any disobedience. I will brook no refusal.

verb
3
0
To put up with; endure.

I will brook no interference.

verb
3
1
The definition of a brook is a small stream.

An example of a brook is a small flow of water along a wooded path.

noun
2
0
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A body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.
noun
1
0
(Sussex, Kent) A water meadow.
noun
1
0
(Sussex, Kent, in the plural) Low, marshy ground.
noun
1
0
A surnamefor someone living by a brook.
pronoun
1
0
A surname, a transliteration and normalization of Hebrew ברך (barúkh, “blessed”).
pronoun
0
0
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A male given name transferred from the surname.
pronoun
0
0
A female given name of modern usage; more often spelled Brooke.
pronoun
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
brook
Plural:

Origin of brook

  • Middle English brouken from Old English brūcan to use, enjoy

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English brouken (“to use, enjoy”), from Old English brūcan (“to enjoy, brook, use, possess, partake of, spend”), from Proto-Germanic *brūkaną (“to enjoy, use”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrūg- (“to enjoy”). Cognate with Scots brook, brouk (“to use, enjoy”), West Frisian brûke (“to use”), Dutch bruiken (“to use”), German brauchen (“to need, require, use”), Latin fruor (“enjoy”). Related to fruit.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English brōc (“brook, stream, torrent”), from Proto-Germanic *brōkaz (“stream”), from Proto-Indo-European *mrāǵ- (“silt, slime”). Cognate with Dutch broek (“marsh, swamp”), German Bruch (“marsh”), Ancient Greek βράγος (brágos, “shallows”) and Albanian bërrak (“swampy soil”).

    From Wiktionary