Sequester meaning

sĭ-kwĕstər
To sequester is to take something or someone out of the mainstream or out of circulation and put into isolation.

When a judge orders that a jury in a high-profile case be kept in a hotel for the duration of the trial, this is an example of a situation where the judge sequesters the jury.

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To remove or set apart; segregate or hide.
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To cause to withdraw into seclusion.

Students who sequester themselves in libraries.

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To remove or isolate (a chemical, often a gas) from an environment by incorporation, mixing, or insertion under pressure.

Plants that sequester toxins from wetlands; plans to sequester carbon dioxide produced by a power plant by injection into an underground aquifer.

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To undergo sequestration.
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To set off or apart; separate; segregate; often, to segregate or isolate (the jury) during a trial.
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To take and hold (property) by judicial authority, for safekeeping or as security, until a legal dispute is resolved.
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To take over; confiscate; seize, esp. by authority.
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To withdraw; seclude.
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To isolate or keep apart from all others, as in sequestering certain funds or sequestering a jury. See also sequestration.
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To separate from all external influence; to seclude; to withdraw.

The jury was sequestered from the press by the judge's order.

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To separate in order to store.

The coal burning plant was ordered to sequester its CO2 emissions.

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To set apart; to put aside; to remove; to separate from other things.
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(chemistry) To prevent an ion in solution from behaving normally by forming a coordination compound.
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(law) To temporarily remove (property) from the possession of its owner and hold it as security against legal claims.
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To cause (one) to submit to the process of sequestration; to deprive (one) of one's estate, property, etc.
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(US, politics, law) To remove (certain funds) automatically from a budget.

The Budget Control Act of 2011 sequestered 1.2 trillion dollars over 10 years on January 2, 2013.

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(international law) To seize and hold enemy property.
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(intransitive) To withdraw; to retire.
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To renounce (as a widow may) any concern with the estate of her husband.
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(law) A person with whom two or more contending parties deposit the subject matter of the controversy; one who mediates between two parties; a referee.

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(medicine) A sequestrum.
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Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
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Origin of sequester

  • Middle English sequestren from Old French from Latin sequestrāre to give up for safekeeping from Latin sequester depositary, trustee sekw-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Late Latin sequestrō (“set aside"), from Latin sequester (“mediator, trustee").

    From Wiktionary