Hypocrisy meaning

hĭ-pŏkrĭ-sē
Frequency:
The claim or pretense of holding beliefs, feelings, standards, qualities, opinions, behaviours, virtues, motivations, or other characteristics that one does not in actual fact hold. [from early 13th c.]
noun
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3
A pretending to be what one is not, or to feel what one does not feel; esp., a pretense of virtue, piety, etc.
noun
7
1
Hypocrisy is defined as saying or feeling one thing and doing another.

An example of hypocrisy is writing a book about truth and honesty using made up stories to make your point.

noun
5
1
The practice of professing beliefs, feelings, or virtues that one does not hold or possess; falseness.
noun
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1
An act or instance of such falseness.
noun
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2
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An instance of either or both of the above.
noun
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0
The practice of engaging in the same behaviour or activity for which one criticises another; moral self-contradiction whereby the behavior of one or more people belies their own claimed or implied possession of certain beliefs, standards or virtues.
noun
1
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Origin of hypocrisy

  • Middle English ipocrisie from Old French from Late Latin hypocrisis play-acting, pretense from Greek hupokrisis from hupokrīnesthai to play a part, pretend hupo- hypo- krīnesthai to explain middle voice of krīnein to decide, judge krei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English ipocrisie, from Old French ypocrisie, from Late Latin hypocrisis, from Ancient Greek ὑπόκρισις (hupokrisis, “answer, stage acting, pretense”), from ὑποκρίνομαι (hupokrinomai, “I reply”), from ὑπό (hupo, “under, equivalent of the modern "hypo-" prefix”) + the middle voice of κρίνω (krinō, “I separate, judge, decide”).

    From Wiktionary