Gloss meaning

glôs, glŏs
Gloss is defined as to make or become shiny, or to hide.

An example of gloss is to apply shiny lipstick; gloss the lips.

An example of gloss is to try to cover up a lie; gloss over the truth.

verb
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The definition of gloss is a bright or polished appearance.

An example of gloss is a sheen from shiny lipstick.

noun
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A surface shininess or luster.
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A kind of paint that dries to a shiny finish.
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A cosmetic that adds shine or luster, such as lip gloss.
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A superficially or deceptively attractive appearance or good reputation.

The firm lost some of its gloss when its investments performed poorly.

noun
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To give a bright sheen or luster to.
verb
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To apply a gloss to.

Glossed her lips.

verb
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A surface shininess or luster.
noun
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A kind of paint that dries to a shiny finish.
noun
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A cosmetic that adds shine or luster, such as lip gloss.
noun
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A superficially or deceptively attractive appearance or good reputation.

The firm lost some of its gloss when its investments performed poorly.

noun
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To give a bright sheen or luster to.
verb
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To apply a gloss to.

Glossed her lips.

verb
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An extensive commentary, often accompanying a text or publication.
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A purposefully misleading interpretation or explanation.
noun
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To provide (an expression or a text) with a gloss or glosses.
verb
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To give a false interpretation to.
verb
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The brightness or luster of a smooth, polished surface; sheen.
noun
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A deceptively smooth or pleasant outward appearance, as in manners or speech.
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noun
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To give a polished, shiny surface to; make lustrous.
verb
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To smooth over or cover up (an error, inadequacy, fault, etc.); make appear right by specious argument or by minimizing.
verb
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To become shiny.
verb
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Words of explanation or translation inserted between the lines of a text.
noun
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A false or misleading interpretation.
noun
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To furnish (a text) with glosses.
verb
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To interpret falsely.
verb
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To annotate a text.
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Glossary.
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(uncountable) A surface shine or luster/lustre.
noun
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(uncountable, figuratively) A superficially or deceptively attractive appearance.
noun
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To give a gloss or sheen to.
verb
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To make (something) attractive by deception.
verb
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(intransitive) To become shiny.
verb
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(countable) A foreign, archaic, technical, or other uncommon word requiring explanation.
noun
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(countable) A brief explanatory note or translation of a difficult or complex expression, usually inserted in the margin or between lines of a text.
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(countable) A glossary; a collection of such notes.
noun
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(countable) An extensive commentary on some text.
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(countable) A brief explanation in speech or in a written work, including a synonym used with the intent of indicating the meaning of the word to which it is applied.
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(countable, law, US) An interpretation by a court of specific point within a statute or case law.
noun
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To add a gloss to (a text).
verb
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To give a deliberately false interpretation of.
verb
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(chiefly anatomy) Tongue.
prefix
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(uncommon) Speech, language.
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Origin of gloss

  • Middle English glose from Old French from Medieval Latin glōsa from Latin glōssa foreign word requiring explanation from Greek tongue, language

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps of Scandinavian origin Icelandic glossi a spark ghel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps of Scandinavian origin Icelandic glossi a spark ghel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Late Latin glossa (“an obsolete or foreign difficult word requiring explanation, later applied to explanation itself”), from Ancient Greek γλῶσσα (glōssa, “tongue, language, an obsolete or foreign word requiring explanation”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From a Germanic language, perhaps Middle High German, Dutch or Icelandic (compare glossi (“a blaze”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • From the Ancient Greek γλῶσσα (glōssa, “tongue"); compare -glossia, glott-.

    From Wiktionary