Wand definitions

wŏnd
A thin supple rod, twig, or stick.
noun
85
2
A slender rod carried as a symbol of office in a procession; a scepter.
noun
82
0
A conductor's baton.
noun
79
1
A stick or baton used by a magician, conjurer, or diviner.
noun
76
2
A pipelike attachment that lengthens the handle of a device or tool.

A vacuum cleaner that has two extension wands.

noun
73
1
A handheld electronic device, often shaped like a rod, that is used for security purposes to detect metal.
noun
70
1
A narrow slat used as an archery target.
noun
67
2
To scan (a person, for example) with an electronic wand.
verb
64
1
A slender, supple switch or shoot, as of a young tree.
noun
47
0
A rod or staff carried as a symbol of authority; scepter.
noun
44
1
A rod regarded as having magical powers, as one used by a magician or fairy.
noun
41
1
Any of various rod-shaped, usually hand-held devices, attachments, etc.
  • An applicator for cosmetics.
  • An electronic sensor for reading bar codes.
noun
38
1
A slat 6 feet high and 2 inches wide, used as a target at a distance of 100 yards for men and 60 yards for women.
noun
35
1
A stick or staff.
noun
3
0
(by extension) An instrument shaped like a stick or staff such as a curling wand.
noun
3
0
A wand is a handheld optical reader that is used to read barcodes as well as typewritten, printed and OCR fonts. Wands are used to capture product information for retail and warehouse applications.
0
0
A magic wand.
noun
0
0
A branch or stalk, especially of willow.
noun
0
0
A suit of the minor arcana in tarot, or a card of that suit.
noun
0
0
To scan (e.g. a passenger at an airport) with a metal detector.
verb
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Origin of wand

From Middle English wand, wond, from Old Norse vÇ«ndr (“switch, twig") , from Proto-Germanic *wanduz (“rod"), from Proto-Indo-European *wendÊ°- (“to turn, twist, wind, braid"). Cognate with Icelandic vendi (“wand"), Danish vÃ¥nd (“wand, switch"), German Wand (“septum"), Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌽𐌳𐌿𐍃 (wandus, “rod").