Mace definition

mās
Frequency:
A ceremonial staff borne or displayed as the symbol of authority of a legislative body.
noun
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A macebearer.
noun
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A heavy medieval war club with a spiked or flanged metal head, used to crush armor.
noun
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A ceremonial form of this weapon.
noun
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A common name for some types of tear gas and pepper spray.
noun
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A thin fleshy red covering that surrounds the kernel of the nutmeg, dried and used as a spice.
noun
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A trademark for an aerosol used to immobilize an attacker temporarily. This trademark often occurs in print as a verb and noun.
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A chemical compound, an aerosol that has the combined effect of a tear gas and a nerve gas, temporarily stunning its victims.
proper name
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To spray with Mace.
verb
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A heavy fighting club.
noun
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A long baton used by some drum majors to keep time and lead a marching band. If this baton is referred to as a mace, by convention it has a ceremonial often decorative head, which, if of metal, usually is hollow and sometimes intricately worked.
noun
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To spray in defense or attack with mace (pepper spray, or, formerly, tear gas) using a hand-held device.
verb
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(informal) To spray a similar noxious chemical in defense or attack using an available hand-held device such as an aerosol spray can.

1989 Hiaasen, Carl, Skin Tight, Ballantine Books, New York, ch.22.

verb
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To hit someone or something with a mace.

Get over here! I'll mace you good!

verb
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An old money of account in China equal to one tenth of a tael.
noun
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An old weight of 57.98 grains.

noun
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A spice obtained from the outer layer of the kernel of the fruit of the nutmeg.
noun
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anagrams
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A brand of tear gas.
pronoun
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Such a compound, or a container of it.
noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
mace
Plural:
maces

Origin of mace

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin macis alteration of Latin macir fragrant ailanthus resin from Greek makir

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French masse from Vulgar Latin mattea

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English, from Anglo-Norman mace, mache, from Late Latin mattia or *mattea (compare Italian mazza, Spanish maza), from Proto-Indo-European *mat (“hoe, plow") (compare Latin mateola (“hoe"), Old High German medela (“plow"), Russian мотыга (motýga, “hoe, mattock"), Persian آماج (āmāǰ) "˜plow', Sanskrit मत्य (matyá, “harrow")).

    From Wiktionary

  • Borrowing from Javanese and Malay, meaning "a bean".

    From Wiktionary

  • Sense of tear gas, from the trade name Mace.

    From Wiktionary