Mallet meaning

mălĭt
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(music) A light hammer with a rounded head for striking a percussion instrument.
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A kind of hammer, usually with a heavy wooden head and a short handle, for driving a chisel, etc.
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(sports) A long-handled implement used to strike a ball, as in croquet and polo.
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A small, light hammer, usually with a felt-covered head, used for playing a vibraphone, xylophone, etc.
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A weapon resembling the tool, but typically much larger.
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A light beetle with a long handle used in playing croquet.
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The stick used to strike the ball in the sport of polo.
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To strike with a mallet.
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A type of articulated locomotive, in which there are two powered trucks, with the rear truck being rigidly attached to the main body and boiler of the locomotive, while the front powered truck is attached to the rear by a hinge, so that it may swing from side to side, and with the front end of the boiler resting upon a sliding bearing on the swinging front truck.
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(cryptography) Often the malicious party in examples of threat scenarios (synonym: Mallory). See Alice and Bob.
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A small maul with a short handle, used especially for driving a tool, as a chisel or the like.
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Origin of mallet

  • Middle English from Old French maillet diminutive of mail maul maul

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French mallet, maillet (“a wooden hammer, mallet"), diminutive of mal, mail (“a hammer"), from Latin malleus (“a hammer, mall, mallet").

    From Wiktionary

  • Cryptographic scenarios use archetypal characters with standard names chosen to remember their role: Mallet was derived from "malicious" and "man-in-the-middle attack", as well as a mallet.

    From Wiktionary

  • Derived from the name of the inventor, Swiss engineer Anatole Mallet

    From Wiktionary