Mail meaning

māl
A trunk, box, or bag, in which clothing, etc., may be carried.

noun
1
0
A postal system. Used with the, sometimes in the plural.

Used the mail to send the supplies; advertisements sent through the mails.

noun
1
1
The definition of mail is related to the handling or delivery of letters and packages.

An example of mail used as an adjective is in the title "mail carrier."

adjective
0
0
Mail means to send something through the postal service.

An example of mail is to send someone a bill.

verb
0
0
Mail is defined as letters, cards, papers and packages delivered by the postal service.

An example of mail is a postcard.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
(now regional) A bag or wallet. [from 13th c.]
noun
0
0
A bag containing letters to be delivered by post; the material conveyed by the postal service. [from 17th c.]

Don't forget to pick up the mail on your way.

noun
0
0
A person or vehicle that delivers such post; the postal service or system in general. [from 17th c.]

He decided to send his declaration by mail.

noun
0
0
(chiefly US) (uncountable) The letters, parcels etc delivered to a particular address or person. [from 19th c.]
noun
0
0
(uncountable) Electronic mail, e-mail: a computer network-based service for sending, storing, and forwarding electronic messages. [from 20th c.]
noun
0
0
Advertisement
See mails.
noun
0
0
To send (a letter, parcel, etc.) through the mail.
verb
0
0
To send by electronic mail.
verb
0
0
(uncountable) Armour consisting of metal rings or plates linked together.
noun
0
0
(nautical) A contrivance of interlinked rings, for rubbing off the loose hemp on lines and white cordage.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Any hard protective covering of an animal, as the scales and plates of reptiles, shell of a lobster, etc.
noun
0
0
To arm with mail.
verb
0
0
To pinion.
verb
0
0
(chiefly Scotland) A monetary payment or tribute.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
Advertisement
noun
0
0
A spot.
noun
0
0
(chiefly british) A vehicle by which mail is transported.
noun
0
1
Mail or messages sent electronically; e-mail.
noun
0
1
To send by a postal system.

Mailed the letter yesterday.

verb
0
1
Advertisement
To send letters and other material by a postal system.
verb
0
1
Flexible armor composed of small overlapping metal rings, loops of chain, or scales.
noun
0
1
The protective covering of certain animals, as the shell of a turtle.
noun
0
1
To cover or armor with mail.
verb
0
1
Rent, payment, or tribute.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
The system of collection, transportation, and delivery of letters, packages, etc.; postal system.
noun
0
1
The collection or delivery of letters, packages, etc. at a certain time.

Late for the morning mail.

noun
0
1
(chiefly brit.) A vehicle for mail.
noun
0
1
noun
0
1
Of mail.
  • Carrying, or used in the handling of, mail.
  • Designating a person, or boat, train, etc. that transports letters, packages, etc.
adjective
0
1
Advertisement
To send by mail, as by putting into a mailbox; post.
verb
0
1
Flexible body armor made of small, overlapping metal rings, loops of chain, or scales.
noun
0
1
The hard protective covering of some animals, as turtles.
noun
0
1
To cover or protect with or as with mail.
verb
0
1
(chiefly scot.) Rent or payment of any kind.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
(1) Synonymous with email when dealing with computer applications.
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
mail
Plural:
mails

Origin of mail

  • Middle English from Old French maile from Latin macula blemish, mesh

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English male bag from Old French of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English mol, maile from Old Norse māl lawsuit

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman male, meole et al., Old French male (“bag, wallet"), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *malhō (“bag, pouch"), from Proto-Indo-European *molko- (“leather pouch"). Compare Dutch maal.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English maille (“mail armor"), from Old French maille (“loop, stich"), from Latin macula (“blemish, mesh"), probably from Proto-Indo-European *smh₁-tlehâ‚‚, from *smeh₁- (“smear, rub").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English mal, male from Old English māl (“speech, contract, agreement") from Old Norse mál (“agreement, speech, lawsuit"). Akin to Old English mæl (“mÇ£l").

    From Wiktionary