Letter definitions

lĕt'ər
A written or printed symbol employed to represent a speech sound or sounds; character in an alphabet: in some languages, as English, some words contain letters that are no longer sounded.
noun
100
1
A written or printed message to a person or group, usually sent by mail in an envelope.
noun
96
0
An official document giving certain authorities or privileges.
noun
92
2
The strict interpretation of the literal meaning, or the literal meaning itself; exact wording.

The letter of the law.

noun
89
1
A cloth representation of the first letter of the name of a school or college, awarded and worn for superior performance in sports, etc.
noun
85
1
A written or printed communication directed to a person or organization.
noun
85
2
A certified document granting rights to its bearer.
noun
82
1
Literature generally.
noun
82
1
Literal meaning.

Had to adhere to the letter of the law.

noun
79
0
To make hand-printed letters.
verb
79
2
An emblem in the shape of the initial of a school awarded for outstanding performance, especially in varsity athletics.
noun
76
1
To earn a school letter as in a sport.
verb
76
1
To make hand-printed letters on; mark with letters.

To letter a poster.

verb
73
1
To write letters on.

Lettered the paper.

verb
73
2
To write in letters.

Lettered our name on the mailbox.

verb
70
1
To set down in hand-printed letters.

To letter one's name.

verb
70
1
To write or form letters.
verb
67
2
To earn a school letter, as for outstanding athletic achievement.

She lettered in three collegiate sports.

verb
64
2
The definition of a letter is a symbol representing a speech sound or a written message.

An example of letter is A.

An example of letter is what a child sends to his pen pal.

noun
15
0
Letter is defined as to earn a recognition in an activity, especially a sport.

An example of letter is to earn an award in college basketball.

verb
12
1
A symbol in an alphabet.

There are twenty-six letters in the English alphabet.

noun
10
0
(plural) Literature.

Benjamin Franklin was multiskilled - a scientist, politician and a man of letters.

noun
9
0
A written or printed communication, generally longer and more formal than a note.

I wrote a letter to my sister about my life.

noun
6
0
(US, uncountable) A size of paper, 8½ in × 11 in (215.9 mm × 279.4 mm, US paper sizes rounded to the nearest 5 mm).
noun
6
0
noun
3
0
(Canada, uncountable) A size of paper, 215 mm × 280 mm.
noun
3
0
A written symbol or character representing a speech sound and being a component of an alphabet.
noun
0
0
A written symbol or character used in the graphemic representation of a word, such as the h in Thames.
noun
0
0
Literary culture; belles-lettres.
noun
0
0
Learning or knowledge, especially of literature.
noun
0
0
Literature or writing as a profession.
noun
0
0
A piece of type that prints a single character.
noun
0
0
A specific style of type.
noun
0
0
The characters in one style of type.
noun
0
0
Learning; knowledge, esp. of literature.
noun
0
0
A type, impression, or photographic reproduction of a character of the alphabet.
noun
0
0
A particular style of type.
noun
0
0
A person who lets, or rents out, property.
noun
0
0
(US, scholastic) Short for varsity letter.
noun
0
0
(printing, dated) A single type; type, collectively; a style of type.
noun
0
0
To print, inscribe, or paint letters on something.
verb
0
0
(intransitive, US, scholastic) To earn a varsity letter (award).
verb
0
0
One who lets, or lets out.

The letter of a room.

A blood-letter.

noun
0
0
(archaic) One who retards or hinders.
noun
0
0

Origin of letter

Middle English letter, lettre, from Old French letre, from Latin littera (“letter of the alphabet"; in plural, "epistle”), from Etruscan, from Ancient Greek διφθέρα (diphtherā). Displaced native Middle English bocstaf, bookstave (“letter, alphabetic symbol”) (from Old English bōcstæf (“alphabetic symbol, written character”)), Middle English bocrune, bocroune (“letter, written character”) (from Old English bōc (“book”) + rūn (“letter, rune”)), Middle English writrune, writroune (“letter, document”) (from Old English writ (“letter, epistle”) + rūn (“letter, rune”)), Old English ǣrendbōc (“letter, message”), Old English ǣrendġewrit (“letter, written message”).