Billet meaning

bĭlĭt
Frequency:
To billet is defined as to provide temporary housing for soldiers in a non-military facility.

When you open up your home and let a soldier live there temporarily, this is an example of a time when you billet.

verb
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The definition of a billet is a place in a nonmilitary facility where soldiers live temporarily.

When an ordinary citizen lets a soldier live in his house, this is an example of a billet.

noun
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A position of employment; a job.
noun
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To assign lodging to.
verb
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To be quartered; lodge.
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A short, thick piece of wood, especially one used as firewood.
noun
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One of a series of regularly spaced, log-shaped segments used horizontally as ornamentation in the moldings of Norman architecture.
noun
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(obs.) A brief document or letter.
noun
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A written order to provide quarters or lodging for military personnel, as in private buildings.
noun
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A position, job, or situation.
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To assign to lodging by billet.
verb
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To assign to a post.
verb
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To serve a billet on.
verb
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To be billeted or quartered.
verb
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(archit.) A log-shaped insert in a Norman molding.
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In saddlery, any of the straps used to fasten the saddletree to the girth.
noun
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A short informal letter.
noun
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noun
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A place where a soldier is assigned to lodge.
noun
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(of a householder etc) To lodge soldiers, usually by order.
verb
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(intransitive, of a soldier) To lodge, or be quartered, in a private house.
verb
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To direct, by a ticket or note, where to lodge.
verb
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Metallurgy a semi-finished length of metal.
noun
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A short piece of wood, especially one used as firewood.
noun
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(heraldry) A rectangle used as a charge on an escutcheon.
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(architecture) An ornament in Norman work, resembling a billet of wood either square or round.
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(saddlery) A strap which enters a buckle.
noun
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A loop which receives the end of a buckled strap.

noun
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(archaic) A short letter; a note.
noun
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Origin of billet

  • Middle English official register from Old French billette from bullette diminutive of bulle document from Medieval Latin bulla document, seal bill1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French billette diminutive of bille log from Vulgar Latin bilia possibly of Celtic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old French billette, from bille (“log, tree trunk”), from Vulgar Latin *bilia, probably of Gaulish origin (compare Old Irish bile (“tree”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle French billette (“schedule”), from bullette, diminutive form of bulle (“document”), from Medieval Latin bulla (“document”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English bylet, from Anglo-Norman billette (“list, schedule”).

    From Wiktionary