Armor definition

ärmər
Frequency:
A defensive covering, as of metal, wood, or leather, worn to protect the body against weapons.
noun
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A safeguard or protection.

Faith, the missionary's armor.

noun
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A tough, protective covering, such as the bony scales covering certain animals or the metallic plates on tanks or warships.
noun
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Covering worn to protect the body against weapons.
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A quality or condition serving as a defense difficult to penetrate.
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The definition of armor is a covering that is worn to protect against weapons.

A knight's uniform is an example of armor.

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The combat arm that deploys armored vehicles, such as tanks.
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The armored vehicles of an army.
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Any defensive or protective covering, as on animals or plants, or the metal plating on warships, warplanes, etc.
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The armored forces and vehicles of an army; tanks, reconnaissance cars, etc.
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To put armor or armor plate on.
verb
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(uncountable) A protective layer over a body, vehicle, or other object intended to deflect or diffuse damaging forces.
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(uncountable) A natural form of this kind of protection on an animal's body.
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(uncountable) Metal plate, protecting a ship, military vehicle, or aircraft.
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(countable) A tank, or other heavy mobile assault vehicle.
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(military, uncountable) A military formation consisting primarily of tanks or other armoured fighting vehicles, collectively.
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(hydrology, uncountable) The naturally occurring surface of pebbles, rocks or boulders that line the bed of a waterway or beach and provide protection against erosion.
noun
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To equip something with armor or a protective coating or hardening.
verb
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To provide something with an analogous form of protection.
verb
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To cover with armor.
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Origin of armor

  • Middle English armure from Old French armeure from Latin armātūra equipment armature

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English armo(u)r/armure, from Anglo-Norman armour(e)/armure, from Old French armëure, from Latin armātūra.

    From Wiktionary