Squire definition

skwīr
A young man of high birth who served a medieval knight as an attendant or armorbearer.
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An English country gentleman, especially the chief landowner in a district.
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A magistrate or justice of the peace.
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In England, a country gentleman or landed proprietor, esp. the main landowner in a district.
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A man who attends or escorts a woman; a gallant.
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The definition of a squire is a medieval knight’s helper or assistant.

An example of a squire is the boy carrying a knight’s armor.

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To squire is to chaperone or oversee someone’s well-being.

An example of to squire is to watch out for your sister at prom.

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A local dignitary.
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A young nobleman attendant upon a knight and ranked next below a knight in feudal hierarchy.
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To attend as a squire; escort.
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A title of respect for a justice of the peace or similar local dignitary, as in a rural district.
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To act as a squire to.
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A shield-bearer or armor-bearer who attended a knight.
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A title of dignity next in degree below knight, and above gentleman. See esquire.
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A male attendant on a great personage.
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A devoted attendant or follower of a lady; a beau.
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A title of office and courtesy. See under esquire.
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(UK, colloquial) Term of address to an equal.
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To attend as a squire.

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To attend as a beau, or gallant, for aid and protection.

To squire a lady.

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1598, William Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost, V, 2, 474.

Do not you know my lady's foot by the squire.

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1620, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy.

"as for a workman not to know his axe, saw, squire, or any other toole,"

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1628, William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, IV, 4, 348.

Twelve foot and a half by the squire.

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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
squire
Plural:
squires

Origin of squire

  • Middle English squier from Old French esquier esquire

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English esquire, from Old French, from Latin scutarius (“shield-bearer"), from scutum (“shield").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle French esquierre (“rule, carpenter's square"), from Old French esquarre (“square") See square.

    From Wiktionary