Gavel meaning

găv'əl
To strike with or as with a gavel.
verb
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A maul used by masons in fitting stones.
noun
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To bring about or compel by using a gavel.
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Tribute or rent in ancient and medieval England.
noun
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A small mallet rapped on the table by a presiding officer in calling for attention or silence, or by an auctioneer.
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To cause (a meeting) to end, be in order, etc. by striking a gavel.
verb
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To strike a gavel.
verb
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(historical) Rent.
noun
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A wooden mallet, used by a judge in a courtroom, or a chairman of a committee, struck against a sounding block to quiet the rabble down.
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(figuratively) The legal system as a whole.
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A mason's setting maul.

noun
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To use a gavel.

The judge gavelled for order in the courtroom after the defendant burst out with a confession.

verb
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A small heap of grain, not tied up into a bundle.

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noun
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A small mallet, especially:
  • One that a judge or presiding officer raps to signal for order.
  • One that an auctioneer raps to mark the end of a transaction.
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Origin of gavel

  • Middle English from Old English gafol ghabh- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Origin unknown
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Old French gavelle, French javelle, probably diminutive from Latin capulus (“handle”), from capere (“to lay hold of, seize”); or compare Welsh gafael (“hold, grasp”). Compare heave.
    From Wiktionary
  • Origin obscure. Perhaps alteration of cavel (“a stone mason's hammer”). More at cavel.
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English gafol.
    From Wiktionary